How Many Water Balloons Can A 44 MAG Round Penetrate?


#1

I thought this was a very interesting ballistics demonstration.

Jason

youtube.com/watch?v=hlZRnpyZjBE


#2

I suspected it would be stopped but was surprised it only took 4


#3

Not really surprised, think about how far bullets go into a pool. I bet a 5.56 fMJ wouldn’t do much better.


#4

You can watch the Mythbusters episode on this, I think they done 2 episodes. You would be surprised how little penetration you get in water.They even tested a .50 BMG. I have done plenty of testing when I was a kid in my parents pool and a 5.56mm only goes about a foot as I recal. Also I remember it flattening out and curving like a banana. Does not matter how perpendicular you feel you are holding the barrel. Of course that was 35+ years ago.

joe


#5

When I was a sailor boy in the USN, we were trained to ditch the life jacket and duck under water as far as possible if being strafed after abondoning ship. I never had to test the theory.

Those were quaint times, eh?

Ray


#6

I’ll tell you an interesting story because the subject is water stopping bullets. I never thought this topic would come up, but I’m glad it did.

I was very fortunate in March 1977 to be able to visit Frankford Arsenal as it was shutting down, but still just barely in operation. One small line was making 5.56 cases. I pretty much had the run of the place, but with adult supervision. The Arsenal’s Commanding Officer told my guide that I could see anything I wanted to, and one of the places I was interested in was the firing ranges where cartridges were tested; in this case, indoor ranges. The Arsenal was testing some kind of 7.62mm NATO electric-powered “Gatling Gun” in part, I think, to see how fast they could get the rate of fire with a particular type of 7.62mm cartridge. The gun was set up inside a small more or less soundproof room and very strongly secured in a steel mount screwed down to the concrete floor. I remember that I was impressed by how short the stubby little gun was. I think it had 6 or maybe 8 rotating barrels with an action fed by a steel tray.

In front of the muzzles there was a manifold/tube formed into a circle about the diameter of an automobile tire. All along the inside of this tube there were nozzles aimed inside at the exact center of the circle. This assembly was a few feet in front of the gun and behind it, there was a second one, just like the first. To fire the gun, first the manifolds were charged with very high pressure water, all of which came together at the centers of the manifold circles, right on the gun’s axis. When both manifolds were going strong, an electric switch started the gun barrels rotating. When they were spun up to whatever speed was being used for the test (or in my case, the demonstration), the trigger switch was turned on which allowed ammunition to be fed. The rate of fire depended on how fast the gun was rotating. We were outside the room with hearing protection on, watching through thick glass.

There was one short blast of fire and sound, but I don’t remember how many hundreds of rounds were fired. It was a lot. That was pretty impressive, but I was most impressed that the first high-pressure water slowed the bullets and the second one stopped them cold. There was a large group of bullets behind the second “water bullet stop.” Very neat, and a great way to test a gun without taking up a lot of space. I took tons of pictures that day 38 years ago and if I can find any of the demonstration, I’ll put them up.


#7

[quote=“Mel”]I’ll tell you an interesting story because the subject is water stopping bullets. I never thought this topic would come up, but I’m glad it did.

I was very fortunate in March 1977 to be able to visit Frankford Arsenal as it was shutting down, but still just barely in operation. One small line was making 5.56 cases. I pretty much had the run of the place, but with adult supervision. The Arsenal’s Commanding Officer told my guide that I could see anything I wanted to, and one of the places I was interested in was the firing ranges where cartridges were tested; in this case, indoor ranges. The Arsenal was testing some kind of 7.62mm NATO electric-powered “Gatling Gun” in part, I think, to see how fast they could get the rate of fire with a particular type of 7.62mm cartridge. The gun was set up inside a small more or less soundproof room and very strongly secured in a steel mount screwed down to the concrete floor. I remember that I was impressed by how short the stubby little gun was. I think it had 6 or maybe 8 rotating barrels with an action fed by a steel tray.

In front of the muzzles there was a manifold/tube formed into a circle about the diameter of an automobile tire. All along the inside of this tube there were nozzles aimed inside at the exact center of the circle. This assembly was a few feet in front of the gun and behind it, there was a second one, just like the first. To fire the gun, first the manifolds were charged with very high pressure water, all of which came together at the centers of the manifold circles, right on the gun’s axis. When both manifolds were going strong, an electric switch started the gun barrels rotating. When they were spun up to whatever speed was being used for the test (or in my case, the demonstration), the trigger switch was turned on which allowed ammunition to be fed. The rate of fire depended on how fast the gun was rotating. We were outside the room with hearing protection on, watching through thick glass.

There was one short blast of fire and sound, but I don’t remember how many hundreds of rounds were fired. It was a lot. That was pretty impressive, but I was most impressed that the first high-pressure water slowed the bullets and the second one stopped them cold. There was a large group of bullets behind the second “water bullet stop.” Very neat, and a great way to test a gun without taking up a lot of space. I took tons of pictures that day 38 years ago and if I can find any of the demonstration, I’ll put them up.[/quote]

I would LOVE to see those pictures. I’m sure a good chunk of the internet would too.


#8

That waterballoon test would be awesome with the underwater Russian AK as a test. It would be sweet to see those long darts slicing through.


#9

Following the theme of projectiles (bullets) and water here is an EXCELLENT presentation- AK-47 fired underwater and filmed at 27,450 frames per second & the science/physics of fired projectile induced cavitation & propellant gas bubble : youtube.com/watch?v=cp5gdUHFGIQ


#10

Doesn’t surprise me much. BBs from a Red Ryder ricochet of off the water balloons.


#11

The other problem I could envisage would be getting the bullets to fly straight along the line of balloons. Deflections would be likely.


#12

Towards the end of World War 2, the US Bureau of Ordnance conducted some experiments to see how far below the water personnel would have to swim to avoid lethal injury from machine gun bullets fired down at them. Pine boards 25 mm thick (penetration of which was judged to indicate a lethal injury) were suspended at various water depths and guns fired at them from just above the surface. It was discovered that .50 cal (12.7 x 99) bullets, fired vertically downwards, would only penetrate the board down to depths of between 1.2 and 1.5 metres. When fired at an angle of around 45 degrees, penetration was achieved at between 0.9 and 1.2 m. When a .30 cal gun (equivalent to the 7.62 mm NATO) was fired vertically downwards, penetration was achieved at 0.3 m but not at 0.6 m.


#13

I lined up about 20 harddrives and shot them with my 50bmg using milspec AP from about 25yds, pretty much straight on. It penetrated about 10 of them before it deflected out the side. That was about 10" of aluminum, circuit boards, glass/metal platters, electric motors etc.

I think it would have gone through all of them had it not deflected.


#14

Even a .50 BMG will not penetrate more than 3 feet of water.