ID? (US .30-06 Guard loading)


#1

Sorry, I lied. This is a REAL last dummy question of 2006. 30-06, headstamp:FA 4 10. Looks like a trainer to me (see corrugation), sorry for blur. Primer has a slight central indentation, but does not look like a firing pin strike. But why do I hear gun powder inside when I shake it?

[color=blue]Photos moved up from a later post by moderator.[/color]



#2

Vlad–First of all QUIT SAYING YOU HAVE DUMB QUESTION". There is no such thing.

Now for your .30-06.You hear powder because it is not a “Dummy” cartridge. It is a .30 Guard Cartridge Model of 1906. It was interduced in March, 1910, Second class components were used so that explains the eariler date on the headstamp.


#3

+1 to Ron’s comments, especially that about “dumb” questions!

Ain’t NO such thing - only thing “dumb” is not to ask!

.


#4

Vlad–I should have explained more. The .30 Guard Cartridge, Model of 1906 was actually first made using a reduced powder load and a blackened case. This was interduced in June, 1907. It was soon found that the blackening on the would wear off due to handling. So in Oct. 1907 the identification for this load was changed to either 5 deep or 5 shallow rings midway on the case. In Jan. 1908, the 5 shallow rings were adopted as standard. However, it was found that the cases were subject to rupture at the rings when fired. This lead to the change to the 6 short flutes on the shoulder of the case, as in your round, in March of 1910. This model remainded in use until 1933 when it was replaced by the M1 Guard cartridge.


#5

To me it looks like a you have a live round there with a FMJ bullet.
If I understand you correct, you are saying the primer has a mark in (center) ? but not from the firing pin. So you are thinking this is not a live round but a training round (short range) with powder.
Well, I would say it is from the firing pin (without seeing it), this round could have been loaded in a Garand or a M.14 semi auto rifle or ??, when the first shoot has been fired the next round has been loaded and the bolt is hitting so hard the firing pin will hit the primer without firing it, just making a small mark on the primer. If I remember correct Garand and M.14 rifle doesn’t have a spring with the firing pin and will hit the primer when the next round is loaded. Then this round was taken out without been fired and ended in your collection. OR any kind of weapon was in bad condition, dirt, too hard spring, broken part or what ever and didn’t have power to hit the primer so it could be fired, and again ended in you collection.
That’s way you can hear the powder, it is a live one. Happy New Year to you all


#6

[quote=“Alex”]
Well, I would say it is from the firing pin (without seeing it), this round could have been loaded in a Garand or a M.14 semi auto rifle or ??, when the first shoot has been fired the next round has been loaded and the bolt is hitting so hard the firing pin will hit the primer without firing it, just making a small mark on the primer. l[/quote]

Could also have happened in a Springfield 03 by lowering the firing pin on a live round (hold trigger back while closing the bolt, retract the striker knob in order to fire).
While the firing pin free floats in both the M-1 and M-14, the -14 was never chambered in 30-06, only in 7.62NATO


#7

[color=blue]Photos moved to first post by moderator.[/color]