Identification of an Artillery shell

Hello. I am a new member here and was looking for a little help in identifying an exploded shell. I authored the book “Civil War Artillery - A Pictorial Introduction” but this obviously is not a Civil War shell. It was mixed in with a Civil War artillery shell collection I recently acquired and was hoping somebody can shed a little light on it. Any help appreciated, thanks. Bob

![image|690x543]

This is another image of the shell.

Dimensions? What does the threaded (nose?) threads look like? Another couple photos would help.

Hi John. Being a new member the site was only letting me post one picture at a time. I’ll put another pic in the next post. The outer diameter is 1 1/4" and the inside one is 3/4". Here is another picture, thanks.

Here is an interior view of the shell.

Metallurgy here appears not to be from civil war days as the material appears too plastic.
Back then most was cast and repsectively brittle.
Also the machining marks do not fit too well and also not the thin metal sheet remnants and the un-threaded fuze well.

So far it appears more like remnants of a 10lbs practice bomb.
Does it have holes in the side somewhere?

On this surviving section I don’t really see any type of holes. The nose is smooth for just a little over 4" and then the fine machine threads begin. The thin twisted metal bands inside seem strange, I don’t know what their purpose would be. I’ve been searching different shells and so far can’t come up with a match.

In my view it is no artillery projectile.

37mm (1.5" =/-) was a very popular artillery caliber for almost all nations starting int he 1880s and nearly everywhere by WW1 through WW2. Many of those had nose fuzes (point detonating) and the “threaded” area may be the portion where the rotating band was located, and some of those were very broad, while others were narrow.
Not sure about the thin strips inside, but maybe indicative of some sort of burster charge for a chemical or smoke or WP round?
Lots of guesses but nothing I can verify.

Thanks for everyone’s input, my guess would be WW1, but again, I’m not really sure.

Also unlikely to be WW1.