Identify projectile

I am posting the question below and pictures for a long time IAA member that does not use the Forum. Your assistance is appreciated. I will pass your responses on.
Bob R.

“I HAVE NEVER USED THE IAA FORUM SO I HAVE ATTACHED THE BEST PICTURES AND AM SENDING THEM TO YOU FOR POSTING. I THINK THIS IS A 20mm PROJECTILE. WHAT I WANT IS TO KNOW EXACTLY WHAT IT IS AND AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE WHAT THE NUMBERS AND LETTERING ON THE BASE MEAN.”



From the stamping, it is a 1 pounder ( one inch) US Naval solid shot, made by Toledo, (Ohio) Screw Products. Probably for 4- Barreled AA guns similar to British Naval Pom-poms.
Doc AV

This projectile is 37mm, considerably larger than 1" calibre.

Doc AV seems to have made a mistake on this one, a truly unique event, compared to his usually complete and accurate info which is most informative. The “1 pounder” is 37mm (1.5" +/-) diameter.

The projectile is U.S. Navy 1-pounder Mark V solid steel projectile, either an armor piercing “shot” which would probably be hardened, or unhardened as a “common” (non-explosive) projectile, used for most purposes. I was not able to find exact reference to the Mark V projectile to see if it was intended for use exclusively with the 37 x 93mm “1 pounder” or the longer cased “Heavy 1 pounder” or perhaps both. Various “Marks” were assigned to distinguish between projectile types, typically some being AP, high explosive, common, or practice.
As Doc AV correctly noted, it was made by Toledo Screw Products Co., and the 17 preceding the maker name is the date of manufacture. Lot 197 is a production lot number assigned for tracking and quality control purposes. The anchor/RRA and anchor/JA in oval are inspector and acceptance markings.

These 37mm guns were used in a variety of single shot, rotary Hotchkiss, or recoil operated Maxim machine gun type guns circa 1885-1920s. The various types of guns are well described at http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNUS_1pounder_m1.php#Ammunition

The 37mm guns continued in use as sub-caliber guns attached to a ship’s larger guns for economical target practice with much smaller danger spaces beyond the target.

Being made of solid steel with a copper rotating band (driving band to Army guys) it is totally safe and inert.

Thankyou, JohnS…it must be the
“Bacco, Tabacco, Venerisque” of my mispent youth at Italian University ( wine, venery)…I don’t smoke…
I am in Italy for my annual R&R…wine, food and good women…old friends and Italy resident wife as well. I mistook 1 pdr for 1 inch…as I know the 37mm Two pounder.
And I missed the 17 date.
Over 20mm is not really my “cup of tea”; every day my mistakes are corrected, my knowledge improves…".a man who never makes mistakes, never makes anything of value."

Thanks again…
Doc AV

This 1 pdr Mk. V projectile was also contract made in 1917 for Russia. This company also made 37 mm cartridges for the US Navy, but they only manufactured the projectiles because they had no loading facility. This latter work was subcontracted to Poole Engineering & Machine Co (PEMCo).

Regards,

Fede

Correct case that goes with it would be s 37x136R btw

I have one virtually identical to this one. It is not solid, but hollow. The tip of the nose can be unscrewed (note the faint line about 3/4 inch from the very tip).