Incendiary storage


#1

I am looking for suggestions on how to store the incendiaries in my collection. I would hate to burn my house down. I can


#2

Collect something OLD…like .30-40 Krag…no incendiaries !!!..Just Kidding !!!..But, I had a thought…and this doesn’t allow looking at them readily, like in a drawer…but, what if you kept them in an airtight ammo can (OD steel type), in the refrigerator…it would keep them cool in the AZ heat…Randy


#3

If you have a basement, odds are it will stay cooler than the ambient temperature outside due to the insulating effect of the surrounding earth. I don’t imagine basements in AZ are as damp as they are in damper and / or cooler areas.

.


#4

NOT an RKI, but these rounds were designed for wartime conditions. They should be able to hold up in your garage without any issues. I also live in Arizona and have stored incendiary ammo in my garage for several years. Granted it was not German. If you are that worried simply leave anything flammable out of the immediate area. They will not mass detonate and a single round is about as impressive as a firecracker.


#5

In 50 years of collecting and knowing hundreds of collectors of military ammunition I have only once heard of ANY cartridge going off without help. This was a .50BMG tracer which had been in the window of a gun shop in Ohio which faced EAST and was in the direct sun for many years. One day it lit off. Store was open so it was minor damage.

I have owned thousands of rounds of incendiary of all types most having been stored in summer temps. 100 and over many years.

The only ones which give me any pause are those which crack and German 20mms. I get rid of the cracked ones and try to stay away from loaded German 20mm incendiaries. Koch told me that some of these can light off by themselves and I want NO part of that.

Good luck !

HEY, where’s that smoke coming from ?


#6

REMINDER- In Kalifornia mere possession of a SINGLE Incendiary or tracer round can bring a raid with the local cops, BATFE, and assorted news media types, and land you in jail after a lengthy court battle and horrendous legal fees. Some other state or local governments may have similar ridiculous policies, so be sure to find out what the laws are where you live.
A flash-bang or smoke grenade chucked through your window is a much bigger threat than a single collector round self-igniting.
Be careful out there, and play by the rules, no matter how silly they might be.


#7

Sound advice- best to keep aware of LOCAL as well as COUNTY, STATE and FEDERAL regulations when dealing with ANY weapons. You also need to understand your mortgage. Some home mortgages forbid storing dangerous materials in the home AND the insurance may not pay off if a fire is started or advanced by stores of ammo. My major holdings are stored in an ammo bunker away from dwellings. How much ammo one can have in the home is up to question in a number of ways.

I keep only self defense ammo in the living quarters of my home. All else is in storage or in my office apart from the living quarters. None of my live ammo is ever available to children or those uneducated in weapons and ammo.

We tend to start taking this stuff for granted. It is dangerous and designed to be so.

My understanding is that California had more than one incident of huge fires being set off by tracers. These fires cost millions of dollars to fight AND often millions more in damage to homes and property. Not to mention the loss of LIFE which is also involved.

Our RIGHT to own ammo is not worth the life of ONE FIREMAN.

BEST TO PLAY SAFE FOR SELF AND OTHERS.

I prefer my public servants (firemen,police, EMT) alive- you never know when you will need them.

How can we get LAWYERS and REPORTERS to fight fires ?

California’s regulations which seen ODD to us have real practical roots in many cases. ( some cases?)


#8

More excellent advice.

With all due respect, John, you left out “POLITICIANS” and “BUREAUCRATS” . . . which are the two least valuable professions, if not the least loved.

.


#9

Tracer and incendiary are all good in Arizona


#10

More excellent advice.

With all due respect, John, you left out “POLITICIANS” and “BUREAUCRATS” . . . which are the two least valuable professions, if not the least loved.

.[/quote]

OF COURSE YOU ARE CORRECT AND MOST POLITICIANS ARE LAWYERS .


#11

I assume you are talking about incendiary cartridges that have white or yellow phosphorous as the filler? I would store them in a cool, temperature stable environment. Corect me if I am wrong, but most, if not all post WWII incendiary (and much of the incendiary used during WWII) are not phosphorous based, and thus not nearly as much of an issue for storage. I store all of my ammunition, both collector and shooter types in a cool, dry corner of my cellar. It’s just a good practice top prolong the life of the ammunition.

Speaking from experience, I have started grass fires with tracer ammunition, in California no less, but this was on a controlled military range. It still pissed-off the brass who had to close down the firing ranges for several months after they realized how dry everything was and how hot the ammunition we were shooting was! We even had to pull the tracers from our belted 7.62 and 5.56. That was a chore!

Sage advice from CSAEOD…as usual.

AKMS


#12

AKMS

Yup, that’s exactly what I was Referring to. I collect just 7.9 Mauser and the German Spr, PmK And B-Patrone loadings all contain phosphorus. I have never had a leak yet (underline yet!!), and I would like to minimize the chances of developing one. Last January at the annual CCC show in Prescott, AZ. a friend of mine showed me the mangled case of a Yugoslav “EZ” round (which were loaded using WWII German B-Patrone bullets) that had leaked, ignited, set off the explosive element and the powder. It was in a 50 cal. ammo can full of “EZ” 15 round boxes. Strange thing was it didn’t damage any of the other boxes. It did leave a clear impression of the headstamp on the inside back wall of the can. The box in the scan was in that ammo can.

pbutler


#13

I have never heard of a B-Patrone doing this. During WW2 we tested them in many ways including cooking them. They were not easy to get to pop. It is not clear if the Yugoslavs pulled these from loaded ammo or had a stock of unloaded ones. If they pulled them they may have damaged the jacket in some way. I would very much like to see a photo of that shell.


#14

I ran this story by Woodin Lab expecting that it would be refuted. To my surprise it has happened before with a B Patrone in a major collection.

THIS IS NOT GOOD NEWS FOR THOSE OF US WHO COLLECT GERMAN MILITARY AMMO OR INCENDIARY OF VARIOUS TYPES.


#15

As this ammo gets older and less stable we all need to start thinking about this VERY SERIOUSLY.


#16

[quote=“CSAEOD”]I ran this story by Woodin Lab expecting that it would be refuted. To my surprise it has happened before with a B Patrone in a major collection.

THIS IS NOT GOOD NEWS FOR THOSE OF US WHO COLLECT GERMAN MILITARY AMMO OR INCENDIARY OF VARIOUS TYPES.[/quote]

Yes, it’s happened.

Dutch


#17

Really disturbing.


#18

Was this due to excessive heat ?


#19

Awesome! Nothing like photographic evidence to proove things. WOW!


#20

So far 2 reported incidents of B Patrones going off by themselves. Any other incidents?