Induction Heating of Shells

My apologies for the poor quality of the enclosed page, it comes from an on-line archive of Electronics magazine published in the US and this is the best copy I could make. It’s an interesting contrast to the use of gas jets that I’ve seen documented elsewhere.

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Peter

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Whilst gas jet annealling was the Industry standard from the 1920s onwards ( introduced for finished cases for US Semi-auto use in 1920s);the Russians pioneered the method in pre-WWI…and introduced it to WCC during 1915 for 7.62x54R production.
By the end of WWII, there was the beginning of Electric Induction annealling for better repeatable results.
Today, close to 100% of High production case-making uses Induction…( SCAMP, Manhurin, New LaChaussee, Fritz Werner).

There are even DIY reloaders units ( bench top) now available.

Doc AV

Answer for .30/40 krag Re:
7.62x54R at WCC in1916…
See Frost “Ammunition Manufacture” NRA Publications, 1980s circa.
Frost, as a young Engineer in the mid-1930s, worked at Western Cartridge Company at Alton Illinois, with an emigre’ Russian Artillery Officer who had been a Tsarist Factory Inspector 1915-1917 for the Russian Ammunition contracts at WCC.
He introduced Case neck and shoulder annealing for all Russian contract ammo at WCC as was already done in Russia.
This annealing produced cartridge
cases less liable to “season cracking” ( wide change in summer to winter temperatures in most of Russia.)…The US learned this when Billions of .30 M1906 cartridges produced in WWI began neck-cracking in the early 1920s…not observed in small qtys produced before WWI, as this wss liable to be used up before many years had passed, and before cracking took place…
The US did not introduce neck and shoulder annealing until the early 20s when Semi autorifles were being tested.
It also happened to .303 contracted to Winchester for
Britain during WWI, so much so that this ammo given to Portugal in 1919, was by 1927-8 condemned, and the bullets recycled to AE produced cases. Projectiles pulled
from 1928 AE show typical W 15 double cannelure, and shorter than MarkVII profile (no aluminium point insert.)
I have some W15 from both Aussie and Portuguese Sources that show neck cracking and very similar projectile design.
NB A lot of both cartridges and Dupont MR 14 & 16-1/2 powder was dumped in the North Sea because of stability/ case failure/ loading Issues, in 1919-20 ( not all, aside from the Portuguese “gift” a lot was also shipped to the Baltic States and Poland ( Poland for P14 rifles, Estonia etc. for MLE, CLLE and SMLE and relative MGs.
These Baltic countries got mostly Cordite Ammo of 1918 or 1920s Kynock manuf., so without serious
Season cracking…so much so that
Volunteer militia in Moscow 1941 were issued with ex-Baltic LE and P14 rifles and two chargers of ammo each ( TASS news-reel).
The Ice Road guards on Lake Ladoga ( Leningrad Siege) were also issued with P14s. .Newsreel again).

Doc AV

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