Info sought on a 33 Round Box for Canadian .303


#1

Good day,

Would anyone be able to shed some light on the purpose of this 33 round box for Canadian .303 British Mk.VII ammunition? In the time I have been intrigued with this calibre I have never encountered this particular variation of box, but I recently found a couple from different sources. Regrettably, the boxes I have found had been opened by previous owners and each contained an assortment of Canadian WWII headstamps from both DAC and DI, which in my opinion fails to add additional meaningful detail as to their purpose.

In any event, attached below are three photos of the box (I added a standard 48 round box for size comparison) in the hope that someone can provide information on this box. The interior arrangement is 3 rows of 11 rounds separated by cardboard dividers.

Thanks kindly for any information you may have.

Regards,
Steve


#2

Perhaps a search of the label no H 11006 could be fruitful.

John


#3

The printed detail on the label is instructive… “C G CANADA” ??Canadian Government, Canada?? Could this be ammo for use by the DCRA (Dom. of Canada Rifle Assoc.)???

The DCRA had a long and wide range of .303 Competition ammo made for it since before WW I…it forms a collecting area on its own.

“.303 Mark VII” definitely Cordite Loads. ( probably "DA C^ ")

The Packet is longer than the 48 round Pack, because the 48 round pack is “Loose Pack” (No dividers) and the 33 round pack is three sections of 11 rounds, with nesting.

I wonder what size Ammunition SAA chest was used to pack these? or was a special one used for DCRA Ammo?

The 33 rounds (like the British Commonwealth 32-round Packs), would fill the need of Musketry training or Competition ( in this case, 3 sighters/wind estimation, followed by 3 x 10 round courses of fire)

Strange that there is NO Date of Packing, nor mention of the Inspectorate of Small Arms Ammunition (Canada) on the Label…“H” series Labels usually have both of these…the Date space is there, but empty.

More questions than answers…but then, that is usual for a Photo>>>> as said above, searching “H.11006” may give some clues…

Doc AV


#4

A google search of the label number yields nothing new. What there is seems to be taken from that label or one like it.

John


#5

Thanks for the ideas and information. Based upon the fact that the box is for “Mk7” ammunition with the Arabic number (as opposed to a Roman “Mk.VII”)’, I conclude they must date from 1945 or later. In fact, I have seen 3 of these boxes and all are with Arabic nomenclature. Regrettably, none of the boxes have the packing date fields on the label completed.

The DCRA suggestion is interesting. I won’t rule it in or out. Prior to WW2, this ammunition came in 10 round packets, not boxes. See photo of typical examples of DCRA ammunition (these specimens dating from 1934 and 1937):

I do have a decent selection of DCRA .303 ammunition and it us my understanding the practice of making this was suspended from 1940 until after the war, although 1944 dated cartridges exist (these were apparently used for post war competitions?). Here are some examples of specimens I have accumulated over the years:

After the introduction of 7.62, the packaging of DCRA ammunition did not follow the 33 round concept, as 40 round boxes were utilized with the 1960 dated DA Match ammunition.

Accordingly, I submit that If the 33 round box is for competition use, it is not consistent with what was used before WW2, nor is it consistent with the later 7.62 ammunition for DCRA use from 1960 onwards. Is this box from the immediate post war period?

Again, keep the input coming. I’m hoping someone can shed further light on this.

Regards.


Nato round