Information needed: ammo for German G43


#1

Hello,
I am new this forum. Hopefully someone can direct me. My son recently purchased an all matching German G43 bcd. made at the Gustloff-Werk plant. I would like to surpise him for Christmas with a box or 2 of original 8mm ammo to be used for his display. thats where I need the help !

I know the G43’s used 8mm mauser ammo. specifically 7.92 X 57. however, when I go to places like gunbrokers to find original ammo I am finding ammo marked 8mm but loose rounds of around 15 rounds per box. I am under the assumption that the G43 used ammo that came on a stripper clip rather loose ammo. therefore I feel that ammo is more suited for the K98 bolt action rifle rather than semi-auto. the only rounds I can find on stripper clips in original boxs are marked M30. these are dated 1938 and 1938 and are also 8mm but I dont believe those stripper clips could be used on the G43.

socould someone here, direct me with pictures and information as to exactly what kind of ammo box I am looking for? then also direct me to any other place to possibly purchase other than like guins international, guns america and gunbrokers.

thanks in advance for any help.
Sam


#2

Clipped or not, the ammunition for the K98k and the G43 are identical, as are the clips (chargers). There is not specific ammunition, clips/chargers or packaging just for the G43. Not all German 7,9 ammunition came packed in clips/chargers, but was fully interchangeable between all of the rifles. I’m sure a more knowledgeable collector can elaborate, but I have seen far more “un clipped” German 7,9 ammunition boxes than “clipped”.

I think the M30 ammunition you found is 8x56r in Mannlicher type clips, neither of which are correct for the K98k or G43.

AKMS


#3

Look for boxes with labels that say “Patronen s.S.” or “Patronen S.m.E.” in the centered first line. Patronen may be abbreviated Patr.

A wide light-blue stripe down the label shows the presence of steel cased ammo. Buy only ammunition dated 1943 or earlier, otherwise the case might corrode from the inside (due to the powder quality, not the case quality).

Type sS (heavy pointed bullet) is the original lead core. Type SmE (mit Eisenkern) has an unhardened steel core and was introduced during the war to save lead.

If you want to shoot the G43, I recommend against old German ammunition, because it is too complicated to tell good from bad. Yugoslav cartridges (PPU with orange primer seal to signal non-corrosive primer) are in my view closest to the original (sS). Have the G43 checked by a competent person before shooting. East-German (headstamp 04, steel cased) cartridges duplicate SmE, but have corrosive primers.


#4

I am pretty sure that the primer annulus seal color on Yugo 7,9 does not denote a corrosive (or not) priming mixture. I have over 40 years of cartridges in that caliber that I have used and am not aware of a N/C primer other than commercial. All Yugo 7.62x39, 54r, .303, 7.9 military have the orange sealant from the early/mid 1960’s onward. The M-75 (7,9) uses a purple primer sealant, but the primer mixture is still corrosive. The same for the 7,9 tracer (both M54 & M70) which use a green seal, but the same primer.I shoot thousands of these rounds annually and they are indeed corrosive. To add to the confusion, much of the 5.56 loaded with a non corrosive primer in the 80’s, also used the same orange sealant. IMO, it would be best to assume all Yugo military rifle cartridges in 7,9 to be corrosive primed and clean accordingly. If the orange sealant means anything on these Yugo military calibers, I would suspect it denotes a ball loading, GM jacket, lead core. JH


#5

Years ago I was told that PPU identifies the difference between corrosive primers and non-corrosive primers by the primer cup. Corrosive primers have a domed (rounded) primer cup and non-corrosive primers have a flat primer cup.
I have never tested this information, but as I recall, the information came in a discussion about the PPU ammunition with an importer of it (Perhaps one of Hansen Cartridge Company’s people) at the time we were considering putting the line into our store.

Perhaps somene more knowledgeable than I can either confirm this or correct it?

I agree that it is NOT the primer seal that identifies the priming mixture. While I have seen some older PPU ammo with green primer seals, I can tell you for sure that I also have experience with PPU having the Reddish-orange seal on both corrosive and non-corrosive ammunition.


#6

haack48, John,
thank you for pointing out this possible trap, which I was not aware of.
It turns out all the orange primer annulus ammunition I have has the rounded primer base, while the older dark colour corresponds to flat primers. The former are not corrosive, according to my experience firing them.


#7

I found a few cases of this loading a few years back and have reserved it for G41/43 series rifles. Despite the 43 loading date, the powder is a 1940 lot by mog and shows no signs of deterioration. The added plus is the 30/40 N/C primer but the most important part is the steel primer cup which greatly reduces the chance of punchers in these rifle systems and the resulting damage to the firing pin and firing pin channel in the bolt. A common problem in these rifles in my experience. Note the 1935 date of projectile manufacture. JH


#8

Wow, they must have been clearing out the dark corners of some warehouses to come up with that mixed bag of components! Great box label.

AKMS


#9

The “Gesch. 1935” without maker or lot number would indicate that they “pulled down” 1935-made ammo ( no longer reliable) for the components, Bullets and Cases…the cases would have gone for Blanks, and the Bullets for New Ball.

Doc AV


#10

Doc my reading of the label indicates the bullet maker as P186 L. 2. 1935. Maybe Dutch could elaborate. I also have the lot made just before this one; a late OXO 1942 with nearly identical components with the same P186 L. 2 1935 projectiles but with zdh. 88 primers. JH


#11

The Germans always made components on stock.

In this case “oxo” started producing cartridges, but the production of the SmE bullet was not ready. So they loaded sS stock bullets on the first lot of 1942 and 1943.

This is a wonderful box label.

Rgds
Dutch


#12

[quote=“dutch”]The Germans always made components on stock.

In this case “oxo” started producing cartridges, but the production of the SmE bullet was not ready. So they loaded sS stock bullets on the first lot of 1942 and 1943.

This is a wonderful box label.

Rgds
Dutch[/quote]

Here is the 1942 oxo lot 1 sS label Dutch. I forgot that the bullets in this lot were P186 1.L. 1935, not lot 2 1935. JH


#13

What is under the 1942 dated label?

German 7,9 boxes never cease to amaze me…

AKMS


#14

@AKMS

In 1942 the production was starting. It seems to be they had also no new boxes.
They over labelled the retuned old ones. You can find any kind of label under it.

@ JH

They made the fist lot of 1943 also with the first los bullets of 1935.
I was lucky to find one by a deer friend in AZ.

Rgds
Dutch


#15

My few boxes.








#16

If I read the box label correctly, the lot 5 of 1943 cartridges were loaded with projectiles from lots 1 through 7. Would this explain the addition label prohibiting overhead fire use? Not suitable due to the mixed lots of projectiles?

AKMS


#17

[quote=“AKMS”]If I read the box label correctly, the lot 5 of 1943 cartridges were loaded with projectiles from lots 1 through 7. Would this explain the addition label prohibiting overhead fire use? Not suitable due to the mixed lots of projectiles?

AKMS[/quote]

That information I do not know. It appears to be lot 1 through 7. Does not seem to indicate lot 1 and 7. Either would seem to not fit in with production runs of components. A possible scenario might be that allied bombing destroyed such and they salvaged what they could out of those lots. I am sure someone else would have a better summarization.

If the BOX could only talk! Of course, it would be in German and I would not know what it is saying.

Joe