Interesting ctge


#1

I have this ctge but I don’t remember what is it
Any idea .
thanks
JP


#2

hello
this xartridge look a experimental 6x54 sniper and machine gun russian round
but no details are know except that casing is steel lacquered


#3

It’s not a 6mm, it’s a 5.7mm (5.56, 5.6, etc).

It looks like the 5.6 RWS, but the neck is too long.


#4

From the ECRA database it appears to be a .22 Newton. Of the images of the specimens contained in the database, there is one that has a very similar double diameter projectile (although with softpoint projectile).

Paul


#5

It could very well be a 22 Newton. The 22-4000 Schnerring had dimensions so close to the Newton that it is very difficult to tell them apart. A couple of problems I see - 1) one dimension (neck length) is not correct for either cartridge. 2) the 22 Newton used the heavy two-diameter bullets (compared to the lighter Schnerring bullets) but they were usually .228" diameter.

But without having the cartridge in my hands and taking some careful measurements, I’d go with the 22 Newton. Either way, if it’s an original, it is a very collectable wildcat.

Ray


#6

thanks Ray

I will take a picture and check the measurements

JP


#7

[quote=“jeanpierre”]thanks Ray

I will take a picture and check the measurements

JP[/quote]

  1. I confirm the bullet dimensions (5.73)
  2. About the neck length it is 7 mm, (perhaps 6.8 mm but minimum)
    I can check that with a comparator if it is very important

Here is a picture

The other ctge (no hstp) I don’t remeber but it is an US Experiment for sure.

JP


#8

And being with my camera here are two other ctges
One is a 400 Whelen made at FA, the other a 46 American
What is the story of the 400 Whelen ?
JP


#9

JP

I don’t think any additional dimensions from your 22 caliber cartridge will tell us any more. Both the 22 Newton and 22 Schnerring are wildcats from an era I like to call The Golden Age of Wildcatting. Back then, there were many gunsmiths who specialized in wildcats, particularly the 22 caliber. For the most part, gunsmiths hand made their own chamber reamers and the dimensions could vary between cartridges with the same name. The same with barrels. Many were made by gunsmiths and the exact bore diameter often varied depending on the wishes of the buyer. Bullets were also hand-made to match the bore.

As I said, the main difference between the 22 Newton and the 22 Schnerring is the bullet. The Newton was designed to shoot heavy bullets and the Schnerring was intended to shoot light weight bullets. Your appears to be loaded with one of the heavy two-diameter bullets, and based on that alone, I’d say it is a 22 Newton.

The .400 Whelen has been discussed on the Forum and you can probably find the threads with a quick search. It’s also covered in the addendum to HWS I.

The 458 American is another wildcat from post WW II made very simply by shortening any of the belted cases to 2 inches. As a footnote, the 458 American poses some interesting safety problems because it can be chambered and fired in rifles chambered for some of the newer belted cartridges of smaller calibers. Something that the designer, Frank Barnes, would have had no way of anticipating at the time.

Ray


#10

JP

By the way, what is the headstamp on your 22 cartridge, and on the 400 Whelen.

ray


#11

[quote=“RayMeketa”]JP

The .400 Whelen has been discussed on the Forum and you can probably find the threads with a quick search. It’s also covered in the addendum to HWS I.

[color=#0000FF]Ok I have the book. thanks[/color]
The 458 American is another wildcat from post WW II made very simply by shortening any of the belted cases to 2 inches. . Something that the designer, Frank Barnes, would have had no way of anticipating at the time.

[color=#0000BF]You mean Barnes designed this ctge ?
We are not talking about the same ctge.
The name is 46 American and not 458 American

This ctge was designed by a company in Arizona making suppressors and silenced guns
It is a subsonic ctge.[/color]Ray[/quote]


#12

OK, then I have to say that I have no idea what the 46 American is. What is the case length and bullet diameter?

Frank C. Barnes designed the 458 American.

The comment about the 458 American being a dangerous cartridge would probably still apply to the 46 American???

Ray