Interesting Romanian 7.9mm Label/sleeve


#1

While I was placing a piece of Styrofoam in a newly acquired empty Romanian 7.9mm 10 round packet I noticed that the label/sleeve was printed on both sides. One side for the “S” loading, the other for the “SS” loading. The only other Romanian packet (CMC) I have is printed only on one side of the label/sleeve.

The packet originally had rounds with the PA headstamp (Pirotechnia Armatei, Voina Plant, Brasov, Transyvania, Romania).

The labels were translated for me by Liviu Stoica.


#2

Phil - I love it! By the way, did you notice that the two sides spell “Pirotechnia” to different ways - one the way I just spelled it and the other as “Pirotehnia” without the “C”. Wonder if the mis-spelling is why they printed the reverse? Probably not. Just a thought.


#3

John – No, I didn’t pick up on the two different spellings. Odd isn’t it?


#4
  • @ pbutler: The Romanian 7.92 X 57 rimless ammo was NEVER manufactured at the so called “Voina Plant” from the town of Brasov (located in Transylvania) and I’ve NEVER said such a thing. This is WRONG information which was taken from some book or unreliable source. The armament factories from the town of Brasov (Romania) during WW2 manufactured big caliber artillery shell cases and projectiles, land mines, aircraft and aircraft parts, etc., but NOT 7.92 X 57 rimless ammo. The 7.92 X 57 rimless ammo was manufactured in Romania during the WW2 years only by the “CMC” military complex (“Copsa-Mica Cugir”) and so called “Pirotec(h)nia Armatei” which was located first in Bucharest (the capital of Romania) and lated was the new plant from Gorj County (after 1950 knows as “U.M. Sadu” and using the code “22”).
    The Romanian word “Pirotec(h)nia” can be found with or without the letter “h”, both variants are 100% correct in the Romanian language. Liviu 07/04/11 P.S. The “CMC” military complex manufactured not only small caliber ammo but the 7.92mm LMG ZB-30 and the 9mm Orita M1941 SMG (read my article named “Romanian 9mm Orita M1941 SMG” printed on pages 43-50 of the Small Arms Review magazine [printed here in USA] issue January 2009).

#5

Liviu - the mis-spelling mentioned on the dual label Phil showed had nothing to do with the letter “h” which, as you correctly point out, can be in the word or not, with both being correct. It had to do with the letter “c” with one spelling “pirotechnia” and the other “pirotehnia.”

The next question is, are both of those spellings correct in Romanian language? A real question by the way, not a “snipe.” I don’t pretend to know, which I why I ask you, because I know that you will have a correct answer on that question as well. My knowledge of Romanian is limited to similarities with Italian, and Lord knows, my knowledge of Italian is severely limited.


#6

Liviu – In my prior post, I didn’t mention you as the source of the location of “Pirotechnia Armatei”, only that you had translated the labels for me.

At the moment I am not sure where I got that information from. I will have to go through some old correspondence and see who sent that to me.

With the loading date of 3 MAR 1943, would the location of Pirotechnia Armatei have been in Bucharest or had it moved to the new plant in Gorj County?


#7

Liviu, I think, you made the brackets in Pirote © hnia at the wrong place, as usual the © is not used very often, as seen in Mihaela, instead Michaela (in Maidennames). But you are correct, in saying, that both versions can be used, but not in the way, that the (h) is ommitted. The (h) will be there in any case, either as Pirotehnia, or as Pirotechnia…
Thx, Forensic

[quote=“Liviu”]- @ pbutler:
The Romanian word “Pirotec(h)nia” can be found with or without the letter “h”, both variants are 100% correct in the Romanian language. Liviu 07/04/11 P.S. The “CMC” military complex manufactured not only small caliber ammo but the 7.92mm LMG ZB-30 and the 9mm Orita M1941 SMG (read my article named “Romanian 9mm Orita M1941 SMG” printed on pages 43-50 of the Small Arms Review magazine [printed here in USA] issue January 2009).[/quote]


#8
  • @ John Moss & Forensic: I’m very sorry, I was in a hurry to answer and it was my mistake and that letter is “c”, not “h”. Yes, both versions “Pirotechnia” or “Pirotehnia” are 100% correct in the Romanian language.
  • @ pbutler: Knowing that 7.92 X 57 rimless Romanian ammo is dated “March 1943”, I would say that it was made in Gorj County where also 13.2 X 99 rimless ammo was manufactured during the WW2 years. The ammo facility located in Bucharest was correctly considered by the Romanian authorities to become a real hazard for the Romanian capital and this proved to be true; Bucharest was bombed by the USAAF starting with April 1944 in order to destroy mainly the railway system (not oil targets). If you’re interested, I can find out what the “Voina Plant” from the town of Brasov manufactured during the WW2 years. Liviu 07/05/11 P.S. The main Romanian ammo plant which was making during the WW2 years 7.92 X 57 rimless cartridges was definitely “C.M.C.”, not the facility from Gorj County.

#9
  • @ pbutler: The so called “Voina Plant” from the town of Brasov (Transylvania, Romania) was actually named “DUMITRU VOINA” and during the WW2 years manufactured anti-tank devices, not 7.92 X 57 rimless ammo. The town of Brasov is located about 110 miles (about 175 Km) north-west of Bucharest, the capital of Romania. The Romanian aircraft industry was located in Brasov during the WW2 years, making various types of the I.A.R. military planes. Liviu 07/05/11