Is it original or just chewed?


#1

I get tohs old .30 W.C.F. cartridge with protected primmer and an unusual chevron-like point.

Is it original?
When was it loaded?
Thanks
Martin


#2

I would say it is not original. Looks badly chewed. Bill


#3

For many years, I used various lever action rifles for deer hunting. Throughout the course of a season, the rifles were loaded and unloaded many times with the same 5 or 6 cartridges. The bullet noses were chewed up like the one pictured by the end of the season.


#4

May be due to repeated cycling of rounds through the action, but the striations on the lead nose seem unusually regular in shape and spacing. I’ve never seen a bullet nose that looks that way, except possibly for those Simunition 7.62x51 SRTA rounds having plastic bullets with fins on the nose.

On another but related topic, I’ve seen a lot of old .30-30 rounds with protected primers (and have a few), but in no other caliber (although it might be logical for any other smaller caliber round used in a tubular magazine, such as the .25-35 or .32 Win Special). It would not have been necessary for ammunition used in the Remington 14-141 due to the odd tubular magazine design. What calibers are known to have used the protected primer and about when did the use of that primer design cease? Who besides WRA loaded protected primers? How about non-US use (e.g., for the 8mm Kropatschek 1886, which used a tubular magazine)?

I remember reading an article somewhere about an extensive series of tests being performed using FMJ spitzer-bulleted cartridges in a tubular magazine, the result being that normal primers could not be induced to fire under recoil that way under any circumstances, even under simulated recoil much greater than that which would exist during actual firing. Does anyone else remember that article?


#5

Look around in the archives, I believe it was posted here a while back.


#6

Thanks for helping.
It looks too regular spaced for a loading deformation (IMHO) but if nobody have seen a original cartridge like this…
It also have a little hollow point not easy to see in the picture.
Thanks
Martin


#7

[quote=“DennisK”]
I remember reading an article somewhere about an extensive series of tests being performed using FMJ spitzer-bulleted cartridges in a tubular magazine, the result being that normal primers could not be induced to fire under recoil that way under any circumstances, even under simulated recoil much greater than that which would exist during actual firing. Does anyone else remember that article?[/quote]
That generally concurs with my experience but the spitzer bullets make the round too long to feed which is a separate issue.