Italian 7.62x63mm (.30-06) Ammo Can Label, SMI 1972

Nice M19A1 ammo can (empty) label:

250 CARTUCCIA 7,62 (.30) 1 TRACCIANTE M25 E 4 ORDINARIA M2 IN NASTRO M1 PER MG BROWNING

250 CARTRIDGES 7.62 (.30) 1 TRACER M25 AND 4 BALL M2 IN BELT M1 FOR MG BROWNING

Corrections for the translation are most welcomed.

Brian

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“Traduzione perfetta”
Perfect translation my friend
The producer is the Italian SMI (Italian Metallurgical Company) which closed production in 1999
Until then it has been the largest supplier of long cartridges of the Italian Armed Forces.
It was made in 1972

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Grazie, Giovanni

It has to be an M19 can, because the M19A1 can was made narrower to hold belts of 7.62mm NATO [7.62x51mm] cartridges.

Side by side comparison of the Italian ammo can shown in the post above with an Australian can stamped “M19A1”:

I cannot see that the Italian can is wider than the marked M19A1 can.

Brian

The M19 was replaced by the M19A1 around 1954, when the shorter 7.62mm NATO cartridge was adopted. I had read that one of the improvements was making it narrower by about 12mm (63mm to 51mm) because it had to hold the thicker (necked down) 7.62mm NATO without it rattling around.

The M19 was also supposed to carry .30 Caliber [7.62x63mm] 250 rounds belted / 225 rounds linked and the M19A1 holds 200 rounds 7.62mm NATO [7.62x51mm]; I also assumed it was shorter as well. I’d like to see them measured up against an original M19 ammo can for comparison.

I’m surprised to see Australia using M19A1 cans rather than British H.82 .30-caliber cans. It may be due to NATO standardization / compatibility or closer military ties to the US than to the UK.

Sidney, the M19A1 was developed for the .30 Cal. cartridge (.30-06) and there is no relationship with the adoption of 7.62 mm cartridge. An alternate variant of the M19 existed by 1949 and the military specification of the improved A1 model dates from May 15, 1953, although requirements for the manufacture were released as early as 1951.

Regards,

Fede

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