Italian 9mm


#1

This is in reply to an old post of 2012 I could not help follow the discussion about these Italian GFL
loadings I found that I have a few of these among my things for some I need explanations myself
OK here are some:
G.F.L.9.M38 1939 green Annulus copper clad Bullet
G.F.L.9.M38 1940 Green Annulus Copper clad Bullett
G.F.L.9.M38 1941 Green Annulus copper clad bullet
G.F.L.9.M38 1941 green annulus Nickel clad bullet
G.F.L.9.M38 1942 green annulus Nickel clad bullet
G.F.L. 9 M38 1943 green annulus Nickel clad bullet
G.F.L.9 M38 1948 Brass primer Nickel bullet
Fiocchi 1918 brass case truncated bullet
LB.C.M16 Leon Beaux?
B.P. 16 brass case truncated bullet
B.P. P-14 brass case truncated bullet
Aguila 9mm Luger
Then I am in possession of two MAXIM rounds glisentis? HST MAXIM USA 1918 and one for 1917
The last one is a mystery and I will give the measurements a very tight crimp around a more short and
roundish bullet the Stamp is a poor F 11 with a star on a triangle arrangement.
Rim:402
Head 383
case mouth:382
case lenght : 855 Nickel Primer

Sherryl


#2

Good background information can be found at the webpage links listed below:

http://www.munizioni.eu/italiane2/13-italiane/40-la-cartuccia-9-m38-ita.html

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.munizioni.eu%2Fitaliane2%2F13-italiane%2F40-la-cartuccia-9-m38-ita.html&edit-text=&act=url

http://www.munizioni.eu/italiane2/13-italiane/181-le-9-x-19-mm-9m38-e-9-parabellum-italiane.html

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.munizioni.eu%2Fitaliane2%2F13-italiane%2F181-le-9-x-19-mm-9m38-e-9-parabellum-italiane.html&edit-text=&act=url

http://www.munizioni.eu/italiane2/13-italiane/38-9-glisenti.html

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.munizioni.eu%2Fitaliane2%2F13-italiane%2F38-9-glisenti.html&edit-text=


#3

Hmhm…Aguila: Italian?


#4

bdgreen
Thank you for sending this on I will try to store that one this sheet say more than someone
trying to explain things
thanks again
sherryl


#5

Aguila is Mexican and a relatively new maker of centerfire pistol ammunition I think. Most of their production as far as I know has been .22 Rim Fire.

So no idea why Sherryl would consider it Italian, but perhaps I miss-understood your reply?


#6

Compared to WWII ammunition, I suppose you could describe Aguila
as a “relatively new maker” especially in regard to CF pistol ammunition.
The company was founded in 1961 as Cartuchos Deportivos de México, S.A.,
later becoming Industrias Tecnos, S.A. de C.V. So, they have been in the ammo
business for about 58 years. It seems though that they actually began the
manufacture of cartridges in the middle of the year 1963. My earliest catalog for Them
is dated, if I am reading a catalog printer’s line correctly, is from June 1967, and it is
still under the C.D.M. (Sporting Cartridges of México in English) name. That catalog
contains only shotgun shells. I believe it was not much longer after that when they
began production of rimfire cartridges.

Unfortunately, much of their catalog material is not dated. However, for at least the last
30 years of so they have produced a somewhat limited selection of pistol and revolver
calibers, to include .30 U.S. Carbine, and more recently, have added the .223 and .308
cartridges to their line. They sell domestically and also export to many countries, and make
both commercial and, more limited, military loadings.

I do not know of any connection between them and any Italian company.

John Moss
ammunition, as well as .30 Carbine.


#7

Thank you all for your replies I thought Aguila was not Italien but that is why I put it out but is this not the
purpose of this site to be corrected?? Thank you John Moss for an excellent piece of research that in its
dept left me floored.
Sherryl


#8

Well, yes, some mis-understanding. No problem, those things happen…


#9

Thanks John I was unaware of when their CF ammunition production line was started.

If it’s in my lifetime I figure it’s relatively new, after all 100 years is the definition of antique, so neither of us qualify for that.


#10

Pete - I think you are probably pretty much right on in that
thinking. In the overall era of firearms and ammunition, 50 or
so years is “fairly recent.” Sometimes we think of things as being
“ancient history.” To put it in perspective, my father’s mother lived
with us, and died when I was ten years old. She was born in 1863,
in the middle of the Civil War. Josie Marcus, the wife of Wyatt Earp
(they are both buried a short way from my house), died during my
lifetime.

In retrospect, I think you were spot on!

John