I've now joined the exclusive club of .58 Schubarth owners!


#1

I have finally acquired a .58 Schubarth. It is one of the more desirable American cartridges and seems to trade for insane prices. I do think the price they have previously gone for is a little out of line because there are more out there than I think a lot of people think there are. A couple people I talked to think there were around 7 or so known, but off the top of my head I came up with around a dozen that I know of. This makes me believe there are easily some I do not know of. Maybe there are a couple dozen that exist.

This particular example was once owned by Colonel Berkeley R. Lewis who acquired it from the Smithsonian.

The whole idea of the cartridge and rifle is based on a modification and improvement of Gallager & Gladding’s cartridge and rifle that was created a couple years prior. I have new pictures of the Gallager & Gladding cartridge that I will feature in my Journal column (which is currently detailing the relationship of pinfire cartridges and the United States) sometime in the next few months. Schubarth’s improvement was essentially to make it waterproof.

(ammocollectorME; I checked it off my list, now it’s your turn!)


#2

WOW! That is one of the most interesting ammunition designs I have seen. Congrats big time, Aaron. Really looking forward to reading more about it in the IAA Journal.


#3

Great find Aaron.
The Honus Wagner baseball card is the most desirable but not the rarest.
Is yours a misfire?


#4

I am not quite sure. The document from Lewis that came with this stated that the Smithsonian rules required that the powder be removed. Maybe they shot it? Maybe it was a misfire?

I have seen a couple that look like this.

Also, my theory is that this cartridge was made to be reloadable as well. From looking at the inside of another one it looks like the pin and cap easily swivel into place.


#5

hello
nice view of this particular round
do you had a picture next to a 223 or 308 for scale


#6

[quote=“ammogun”]hello
nice view of this particular round
do you had a picture next to a 223 or 308 for scale[/quote]

Sure!


#7

WHAT A BEAUTIFUL CARTRIDGE AARON!!!

One of these cartridges are on my “wants list”, and I hope to acquire one someday.

Nice addition to the antique collection as well!

-Dave


#8

Aaron, your cartridge looks like one of those inert variations sold by the US Patent Office when they cleared some of their inventory during the 1920’s. Below is a picture of such an specimen:

Regards,

Fede


#9

thank
now i can see the size of this round
it more big that i imagine

i forgot: this round is “classified” as pinfire (internally) ?


#10

Well done that, man, take a recommend!


#11


#12

Yes. I definitely consider it a pinfire variation. It is typically classified as an inside pinfire.

Here is view of the inside from one owned by another collector:


#13

Nice find Aaron. My question is how was the case made? It looks like it is drawn but how could they do it?


#14

Hahaha, I just saw that bit where it says its my turn. Thanks for that Aaron. I doubt I’ll ever come across one.


#15

Looks like The Firearm Blog picked up this post. http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2015/07/19/potd-58-schubarth-an-egg-of-brass-lead/


#16

Nice job Aaron!