Japanese use of boys anti tank rifle


#1

The British BOYS antitank rifle was used on all fronts of WW2 by whomsoever could get them. They were not much good for anything over a light tank but could blind armor with a good shot or knock off a tread. I have seen it in use by the US , Soviet Union , France and Germany but have never see a photo of a Japanese soldier with one.

Has anyone seen this?

Firing it is like getting hit along side the head with a piece of wood attached to a steel pipe and maybe the Japanese soldiers wanted to avoid this. I certainly did after the first shot with mine.


#2

Probably because the Japanese had a superior quality Type 98 20mm Antitank (Semi-Automatic) Rifle, based, I think, on the Solothurn.

The Italians had quantities of the Polish 7,9x109 Maserczek ( even a manual in Italian for it) in both North Africa and Russia. The Italians also had the excellent Solothurn S1800 20mm Semi-Auto AT, on a wheeled Mount, which was widely used in North Africa…Whilst there are many photos of Italians using captured Bren Guns in Libya, there are hardly any of using Boys.( The Italians also used 7,7mm (.303 Br) Ammo,in their Airforce, so resupply was not a problem…for Boys rifles it would have been, in the long term ( as it would have been for the Japanese, as well).

Probably the Number of Boys captured by the Japanese was not sufficient to warrant re-issue on any scale which would attract a photographic record.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#3

The Italians made of .55 Boys (probably in small quantity)

p-j
worldwar.it/sito/munizioni/v … -anti-tank


#4

My wife’s uncle had a Boys at Dunkirk, ordered to stay and guard a road they fired it twice at a German tank without any visible result. Dumped it and headed for the beach.


#5

[quote=“DocAV”]Probably because the Japanese had a superior quality Type 98 20mm Antitank (Semi-Automatic) Rifle, based, I think, on the Solothurn.

The Italians had quantities of the Polish 7,9x109 Maserczek ( even a manual in Italian for it) in both North Africa and Russia. The Italians also had the excellent Solothurn S1800 20mm Semi-Auto AT, on a wheeled Mount, which was widely used in North Africa…Whilst there are many photos of Italians using captured Bren Guns in Libya, there are hardly any of using Boys.( The Italians also used 7,7mm (.303 Br) Ammo,in their Airforce, so resupply was not a problem…for Boys rifles it would have been, in the long term ( as it would have been for the Japanese, as well).

Probably the Number of Boys captured by the Japanese was not sufficient to warrant re-issue on any scale which would attract a photographic record.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.[/quote]

My information is that the 20mm was not widely used. Photos of it insitu are quite rare.


#6

[quote=“pierrejean”]The Italians made of .55 Boys (probably in small quantity)

p-j
worldwar.it/sito/munizioni/v … -anti-tank[/quote]

I have never seen Italians with the gun.


#7

I am sure that happened several times. Did he make it.

The Germans used the ones left behind.

Did Germany make ammo for it ?


#8

[quote=“DrSchmittCSAEOD”]
Did Germany make ammo for it ?[/quote]

No


#9

Did the Italians make .55" ammo?
The Japanese made extensive use of captured arms so I would be surprised that they did not use the Boys.


#10

The link above shows that they did.


#11

The Japanese captured 290 13.97mm Anti Tank Rifles in Singapore along with 349,600 rounds of ammunition.Some 170 were considered in good condition. Where weapons (of all types) were available in some quantity and good condition they were stored either for issue to Japanese troops or to ‘native’ troops. The report suggests that 12 AT rifles with 10,894 rounds of ammunition were issued inside Singapore.
Interestingly all non standard weapons such as Johnston rifles had samples returned to Japan for investigation. Another interesting comment is that 25pds and other A/T guns in good condition were to be shipped back to Japan to be used against the Soviets if necessary as they were expected to use good tanks and Japan had few suitable A/T guns.


#12

Thank you for that information. What is the source ? They must have captured others as well as it was used in many locations by the Brits., Australians and US and maybe the New Zealanders as well. Given that there should be some photos of the same.

Odd that based upon the offering of original photos on ebay and other sites it seems that every other German soldier has a camera and plenty of film but only about 10 Japanese in the their entire army had one.


#13

To who it may concern !

Could you please stop, once for good, calling the Polish AT rifle wz 35 “Maserzek” or some other stupid alliteration ?

The concept of this weapon belongs to Jozef MAROSZEK, and this man, a very well- known and prolific Polish designer deserves to have his name properly written, once for good.

Phil.


#14

DrSchmittCSAEOD,

Information from a Japanese report on the weapons captured in the Far East and in particular Singapore. It is meticulous in details of weapons ammunition and accessories captured. (A few A/T rifles found in Java). It was translated in the US.


#15

It shouldn’t be such an offense or surprise that non-Polish or non eastern-Europeans have trouble with spelling some names from those countries. Many Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Romanian, Bulgarian, and Polish names have spelling which is not plainly obviously based on pronunciation alone. Two of the most famous Pols in the U.S. are NBC news correspondent Jim Miklaszewski (pronounced Mick-la-chef-ski) and Duke basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski (pronounced Sha-chev-ski). Good luck finding any English-speaking person who can spell those correctly off the top of their head.

Granted, with the internet, a simple 30-second diversion would usually reveal the correct spelling if anyone wanted to check, as I had to do when posting the above examples.


#16

[quote=“DKConfiguration”]
Granted, with the internet, a simple 30-second diversion would usually reveal the correct spelling if anyone wanted to check, as I had to do when posting the above examples.[/quote]

Yet everyday you read “SAMMI specifications” in some place. And this is not Polish…


#17

Matt - actually, those Eastern European words ARE based on “pronunciation.” The problem is that even when the letter-forms are the same as in Western alphabets (as opposed to things like Cyrillic, Arabic, Chinese and other Asian idiographs), that does not mean they carry the same sound in those languages, or in all Western languages.

In our area, for example, we have a city named Vallejo. Lots of people not familiar with Spanish names call it “Vally-joe.” Anglo Californians, who smugly think they are always right in pronouncing the local names call it “Va-lay-o.” In Spanish, it is closer to Val-yea-ho in formal Spanish, or “Va-ye-ho” in New World Spanish.

I totally agree, though, that most of us “gringos” have to look these Eastern European words up everytime we use them. I certainly do. It is very difficult to commit the spelling of all the cartridge words in these languages to memory for those of us that don’t speak the language. Still, we should try our best to get names correct, especially. I don’t think minor transgressions in the spelling of other words carries the same impact as slaughtering someone’s name.

Edited for spelling only


#18

Not all names are pronounced as they are spelt. I used to work with (and shoot with) a guy called Alan Beauchamp pronounced Beecham.


#19

Well, a French name in the US…


#20

EOD - you mean a French name in England. In the US, that name would be pronounced by most as “bow - shamp” which is probably still not how it would be prounounced in France. I don’t know hardly any French.

But, Vince’s point is well taken. Sometimes even by the spelling rules of the language, words, and seemingly especially names. are pronounced different due to Regional idiosyncracies and local accents. I never could understand how in America, the famous company of Schuler, Hartley and Graham, of New York, had “Schuler” pronounced as “Skyler.” It makes even oral discussion of any topic, including gun and cartridge collecting, fraught with peril for those that don’t know these idiosyncrasies. I misprounounced the example cited for thrity years, and actually thought “Skyler” was a different company!