Kleanbore primers, a german RWS patent


#1

I just didn’t know that the Kleanbore priming composition used by Remington-UMC was a german patent, and that REM-UMC had to pay royalties for it to RWS (later DAG), according to an agreement set in 1934.


#2

Interesting info and new to me also. The payments would have ended in 1941 when war was declared and it is unlikely they were resumed after the war (does anyone know???) The US companies owned by German companies were taken by the US government and given to US companies. For example Beyer chemicals operations in the US were taken and the petrolum/plastics business was given to Mobile Oil. The businesses were not transferred back an the end of the war, though eventually (1980s I believe) Beyer bought back many of it’s old companies in the US.

Cheers,

Lew


#3

It seems that the 1934 DAG contract was an reissue of an earlier one made in 1929 with RWS.


#4

this is a great document, and one I wanted to print out separately. Unfortunately, the whole document as posted will not print out in its entirety if reduced in size, if printed on legal-length paper, or if rather than separated from the thread, you try to print out the whole thread. It will only print down to about a few lines of Item V. in the document.

Any one know how to turn this into two pages so the whole Agreement document can be printed out?

John Moss


#5

Kleanbore Priming was introduced in October or November of 1925. So, was there a contract before 1929 between R.W.S. and Remington?


#6

[quote=“JohnMoss”]this is a great document, and one I wanted to print out separately. Unfortunately, the whole document as posted will not print out in its entirety if reduced in size, if printed on legal-length paper, or if rather than separated from the thread, you try to print out the whole thread. It will only print down to about a few lines of Item V. in the document.

Any one know how to turn this into two pages so the whole Agreement document can be printed out?

John Moss[/quote]

The document in the book is longer than the one I have posted and spans over two or three pages if I remember well. I can send you the original pages in pdf format, to an e-mail address.


#7

But it was not universally used, it seems. At least, not for government contracts. Here’s a letter from Remington speaking about a 1928 contract with corrosive primers:

[i]Bridgeport, Conn., May 18, 1934.

To H. J. Strugnell *
From J. H.Chasmar.

You will recall that some weeks ago I talked with you about a lot of .30—06 Springfield 172 gr. taper heel cartridges, head stamped “RA28.” These cartridges are left over from a run made for the U. S. Government in 1928 and they do not have Kleanbore primers. This makes them unsalable commercially.

We wish to either pull down these cartridges or dispose of them at a reduced price and you indicated that you might be able to move them to Lyman Gun Sight or through some other concern. The latest cost figures which we have on 0.30-06 Springfield cartridges indicate—factory cost $26.28 —commercial cost $32.85.

We have available almost exactly 5,000 of these cartridges. Will you please see what you can do in disposing of these cartridges in order that we may clear up this matter which has been pending so long?
(Signed) J. H. C. [/i]

  • J. H. Chasmar was works manager at the Bridgeport factory, and H. J. Strugnell was general sales manager of Remington Arms Co.

#8

schneider–I can not speak for military contracts, which continued to use corrosive priming until aprox. 1953, but almost 100% of commercial production at Remington was Kleanbore Primed by late 1926.


#9

Ammunition made on commercial contract for the U.S. government would have been to clearly stated standards, including primers. Shelf life of early noncorrosive mixes was in doubt and not acceptable for military purposes. Jack