Knurled Cannelures on Spencer bullets


#1

I’m going to try this again with as detailed a request as I possibly can make it as per suggestiuons made by the replys to my previous inguiries (thanks to all who replyed). I am looking for any information (with reference citation), anyone may be able to furnish, for a firm date (just year would due) as to when Knurled Cannelures where first used in production of Spencer lead bullets (any of the calibers; 56/46, 56/50, 56/52, and 56/56). I know from Barber that the following maufacturers produced one or all of these cartridges during the date ranges following their names, but there may have been others I’m not aware of and I would be interested in havind that information also.
C.D. Leet & Co. (C. D. Leet) 1862-1866
Winchester Repeating Arms Company 1867-1926
E. Allen & Co. (Forehand & Wadsworth) 1864-1874
Sharps & Hankins 1864-1867
Crittenden & Tibbals 1864-1866
Fitch, Van Vechten & Co. (or their affiliated companies) 1864-1865
The Frankford Arsenal or National Armory 1864-1870
Hall & Hubbard 1869-1874
Joseph Goldmark 1864-1866
D. C. Sage (Sage Ammunition Works) 1864-1866
Schuler, Hartley, Graham & Co. and Affiliates 1866-1867
United States Cartidge Company 1869-1926
United Metallic Cartidge Company (Remmington Arms Company, Inc.) 1867-1926
Dominion Cartidge Company, LTD. 1886-1926

Again there may have been other manufacturers I’m not aware of or affiliated with those listed above or production dates outside of those listed above; I’m interested in the requested information on the Knurled Cannelures use of those as well. Thank you all in advance.


#2

Spencer cartridges were also made by some European makers


#3

Some Eley and SFM Spencer ctges have also knurled Cannelures
jp


#4

Arch…

It is UNION Metallic Cartridge Company…1867-1911…(Not United)…In 1911, UMC and Remington, under the same ownership were MERGED into one company, Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Company


#5

[quote=“archresearcher”]I’m going to try this again with as detailed a request as I possibly can make it as per suggestiuons made by the replys to my previous inguiries (thanks to all who replyed). I am looking for any information (with reference citation), anyone may be able to furnish, for a firm date (just year would due) as to when Knurled Cannelures where first used in production of Spencer lead bullets (any of the calibers; 56/46, 56/50, 56/52, and 56/56). I know from Barber that the following maufacturers produced one or all of these cartridges during the date ranges following their names, but there may have been others I’m not aware of and I would be interested in havind that information also.
C.D. Leet & Co. (C. D. Leet) 1862-1866
Winchester Repeating Arms Company 1867-1926
E. Allen & Co. (Forehand & Wadsworth) 1864-1874
Sharps & Hankins 1864-1867
Crittenden & Tibbals 1864-1866
Fitch, Van Vechten & Co. (or their affiliated companies) 1864-1865
The Frankford Arsenal or National Armory 1864-1870
Hall & Hubbard 1869-1874
Joseph Goldmark 1864-1866
D. C. Sage (Sage Ammunition Works) 1864-1866
Schuler, Hartley, Graham & Co. and Affiliates 1866-1867
United States Cartidge Company 1869-1926
United Metallic Cartidge Company (Remmington Arms Company, Inc.) 1867-1926
Dominion Cartidge Company, LTD. 1886-1926

Again there may have been other manufacturers I’m not aware of or affiliated with those listed above or production dates outside of those listed above; I’m interested in the requested information on the Knurled Cannelures use of those as well. Thank you all in advance.[/quote]
I believe John Barber stated in his book that, knurled grooves came into being about 1878.
M. Rea


#6

M. Rea;
That is true Barber did state, on page 49 that UMC used “plain unknurled bullet grooves” in their rim fire cartridges before the 1878 to 1882 period. However, he dosen’t state which specific cartridges were involved in this production period or if it was a uniform production process to use plain unknurled bullet grooves on all cartridges produced durring these years. So, although this information is of value to me my quest continues to determine who was the first to use knurled bullet cannelures in production ammo. Thanks for your help