L5a3?


#1

It’s not your typical L5A3!
Movie blank?
Definitely not my area. It’s 1.06" long. Any ideas?


Thanks,
Paul


#2

Looks like a UK 7.62x51 tracer case reformed as a 45 ACP blank. I’ve seen examples with a rolled crimp but not a rose crimp. I’ve also heard stories of the plastic blank and short range cartridges being cut down to provide blanks for 45 pistols, but I have no confirmation of this.

NATO Dave


#3

As Dave says, these are Kynoch .45ACP movie blanks. The rose crimped type are more common in the UK.

Regards
TonyE


#4

TonyE - can you post a picture of the rose-crimped version so that we can see the difference? Thanks.

John Moss


#5

John - the round in the picture is the one that Dave refered to as the “rose crimp”. I know it is not exactly like a normal blank rose crimp, but the other type has a slightly coned case mouth with a card wad, somewhat similar to the US military blank.

Regards
TonyE


#6

Tony - Thanks. that actually answers my question, because I would refer to the one shown as having a rose crimp, so I was puzzled about the difference. I have never seen any of the ones reformed to .45 with the cone mouth. Interesting. Do they every show up anymore?

John Moss


#7

Technical question on that blank…

How does that one “headspace”? Is the termination of the radius at the case diameter at the same length of a regular .45 ACP?

Thanks,
Dave E.


#8

DaveE - Yes, the beginning of the “ogive” is at the same height as the case mouth of a .45 Auto Cartridge, more or less. I just went downstairs and tried one of my teo specimens, headstamp as shown on this thread, in my Colt Commander and gentley shut the slid. It chambered no problem. The pressures involved with these blanks would probably make headspace less critical than with ball ammunition.

I suspect these were movie blanks intended for Tommy Guns, rather than pistols. Just my take on them - I have no documentation on them and have never seen a box label for them. They were common in the United States for awhile in two headstamps.

I have never seen even a picture of the cone-mouthed version alluded to earlier in the thread, but it certainly maikes sense that they might coy the outer dimensions and form of the Standard M9 US .45 Blank.

John Moss


#9

John,

Thanks. Figured it would have to locate somewhere to provide for a solid strike on the primer as much as for case issues arising from bad headspacing. I would guess bad functioning movie blanks could be very expensive!

Dave E.


#10

Hi John your wish to see a box has been granted.
Even though the box states pistol cartridges I think they were also for the Thompson.
Date code on the box bottom is “K12 / 68” but the box contains a single as shown above at the start of this thread. By IMI (Kynoch) Witton, Birmingham, England
Sorry for the poor quality photograph, it’s from the built in computer camera with a fisheye lens.


#11

Pete - Thank you. The “Pistol” portion of this label could be simply a statement of the caliber, but then again, of course, it could indicate use in pistols. They would not work semi-automatically in an unaltered pistol, of course, nor full auto in an unaltered TSMG.

Great box.

John Moss