Large brass artillery cartridge case


#1

Hello all,

I recently acquired a large brass artillery cartridge case that I have not been able to identify. Perhaps those of you who know more than I (It would not take much !) could tell me what gun this monster is for ?.

Description as follows:

Yellow brass, rimed, straight walled, tapered,

Rim diameter : 7.990 inches (202.94 mm)
Body diameter adjacent to the rim: 7.34 inches (202.94 mm)
Body diameter at the open end: 7.10 inches (180.34 mm)
Case length: 41.25 inches ( 1047.75 mm)

The head stamp is very light, and mostly non readable, however here is what A can make out.

At the top of the primer hole is the letter "M"
To the right of the primer hole is the number "180"
At the bottom of the primer hole is the number “17”

There is a word that wraps around the primer hole, however only the last portion of the word is legible, it is “BRIK”

The primer hole is threaded, and 1.31 inches (33.27mm) in diameter.

My guess is that it is a 180mm cartridge for something, but what ?

Any info anyone could give me would be most appreciated.

Thanks in advance.


#2

The “BRIK” is the end of the German word for factory- “FABRIK” There are a couple of 170x1050mm German cases. The M most likely indicates the Navy case (Marine). A photo of the base would be helpfull. This is a WW1 German case and not likely 180mm.


#3

Thanks for the info !

In my research I could not find any reference to much of anything in 180mm (except Russian WW2) so I also thought that 180mm was not likely, however does the diameters of this case make sense for smaller calibers ?

I do not yet know how to post a photograph, however if I can figure it out, I will post one.


#4

Most of us use Photobucket.com Easy to use and post. Check it out.


#5

[quote=“screamingbear”]Thanks for the info !

In my research I could not find any reference to much of anything in 180mm (except Russian WW2) so I also thought that 180mm was not likely, however does the diameters of this case make sense for smaller calibers ?

I do not yet know how to post a photograph, however if I can figure it out, I will post one.[/quote]

This is a huge seperate loading case which could also be a fired case. The mounth diameter can vary. It is the most commong of the big WW1 case and projectiles. Hundreds were brought back from the war for testing at Aberdeen. Col Jarrett had his driveway posted with the 170mm projectiles.


#6

I think you are correct CSAEOD .

I tried to take a photograph, however my camera is not great, and the markings are mostly to light to show up.

After a careful cleaning of the head, I was a was able to tease a few more details out of the head stamp, and spawned more research.

The “M” has a crown on top of it. There is a website called "The Western Front Museum " that has some pictures of WW1 head stamps, and according to the info there, the “crowned m” indicates Imperial German Navy.

The number that I thought was a 180 is actually a date. it is “190x” the last number is very faint however it kind of looks like a “5”

Wrapping around the bottom of the primer hole is the last portion of a word “RUHE”.
Many types of German ammo were made in the German city of Karlsruhe, and many head stamps had this on them.

The number “17” stamped on the bottom is very large, and stamped very deep compared to the rest of the marks. I think that this is the caliber in centimeters.

Per my research, the only German Navy guns of 17cm (170mm) were on two classes of pre-dreadnougt battleships launched between 1904, and 1908.

Per the website WWW.navweaps.com, the 17cm guns were secondary armament for the"Deutschland", and Braunschweig" class battleships, and they were of the separate charge type of gun.

Based on that, I believe that I have identified the case.

It is a separate cartridge case for the Imperial German Navy 17 SK/L40 naval gun.

At least that is what I am going to call it unless some further info makes me believe otherwise.

Thanks again CSAEOD ! if you had not given me the direction to go in, I do not think I would have found the additional info.


#7

The 170mms are big beautiful cases usually made at Karlsruhe by DWM. The projectiles come about now and again. They are VERY heavy. The 170mm guns were also used as heavy field mounts clear up into WW2. They could throw a long way.

The headstamps are usually weak on these as they have been sitting on a concrete basedment or garage floor for many years and every time they are moved it is just like taking sand paper to the head.


#8

Really great historical information and research tracking down the ID for that case. I hope someone can post a picture of a complete round. Sounds awesome.


#9

It is a beautiful case, no dents, only a few scratches, and it is the biggest case I have ever seen.

Does anyone have any idea what such a case might be worth ?

I do not plan on selling it, I would just like to know what they go for.


#10

The last ones which I sold went in the $250-350 range.