Lead projectile

Hello, recently found a lead projectile which has a unique design compared to many others I have found. It is 9mm and will slide quite well into a 9mm shell, was just wondering what shell it is most likely to have belonged to.

Cheers Hamish

pop

That looks like one of many, many designs of cast and swaged target-wadcutter bullets generally used in .38 Special cartridges. Since it appears to have been fired, it is not surprising that it would fit in a 9 mm case, with 9 mm usually quoted with a 0.355" bore and some .38/357 caliber revolvers, such as my own Colt Python, having 0.356 bores. I am using the term “bore” generically here. The top groove would be a crimping groove, with the other three grooves for lubricant. These wadcutter designs come in various weights, but most are around 148 grains.

I am using the inch measurement, as the .38 Special and .357 Magnum revolver cartridges are expressed in inch even in many countries that use the metric system.

John Moss

John Moss

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Back in the day, we loaded the .38 Special HBWC backwards in .38 casings, and tried them in the 9mm- it worked fine as long as it was only the first round.
As a defensive round it was impressive, expanding close to .50 upon contact. Deadly on ‘varmints’.
We also loaded light 9mm bullets into both .38 Spl & ,357 Mag cases.

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That would make sense, I’ve found two different lead .38 special wadcutter bullets, a handful of 9mm shells and tonnes of 9mm projectiles. But no 38 special or .357 magnum shells. So I was having a thought maybe somone has loaded the projectiles themselves into 9mm.

Thanks, Hamish.

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Less likely to find revolver cartridges as the extraction is in hand or easily found on the ground. The semi-auto pistol cartridges will be scattered and more likely left.

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