Lépine 9mm HV AP nato


#1

I will post pictures…

Will try to get a courier to the US and legally give a few boxes to your association for money raising…

After that a little bit of info on my 7.62 LR (P1K)…

And back to my lab that will be enough information about Lépine ammo

Regards


#2

Interesting for sure.


#3

By all means, please DO post pictures of this round. Is it 9 x 19 mm?


#4

Was design to give a Glock 26 more power than service pistol those little pills would go from side to side across the front door of an old car Nato specs


#5

One picture missing…


#6

What is the headstamp on those rounds?


#7

@John
The one that match the working target where mark STF 2 (special task force 2)

But for some special Lot there is no headstamp

And for others, special unit headstamp.


#8

I hope you are preserving samples of everything you have made, including every headstamp. Above all, collectors are preservationists. So much ammunition has been destroyed or shot up to the last round throughout the world. It is a shame. After all, samples of cartridges are artifacts from the history of mankind’s manufacturing every bit as much as any other item ever made. It reminds me of the story of Springfield Rifle Model 1903 Serial Number One, which was found in combat service in Europe in WWI and basically “stolen” by a military officer and hand-carried back to Springfield Armory, from which it should have never left. Worst of all, from the story which I hope is not a myth, although I wish it were, is that the rifle had already been converted from its original form into the form generally known today as the '03 Springfield. People knowledgeable in U.S. Martial Arms will know what that means, but since I talk too much about guns on this ammo forum, with the firm belief that the subjects of guns and ammunition cannot be separated and make any sense, I will not go into it here.

The point is, that too often, historically important things made by man are not retained either at the manufacturer, such as the first items of any particular object, nor even by the end users (in the case of weaponry, often destroyed in acts of wanton government vandalism) when their usefulness to that user has ended. America is one of the worst about preserving the artifacts of its own history. Without private collectors, many rare and wonderful items in every field would be lost to history.


#9

To me the images do not work? Are they still present?

John, I fully agree with you! Just that the US are the worst in destroying it’s heritage is to be argued about as other countries like Germany in addition do seldomly allow it’s “servants” to do this then to make up for the govt’s numerous inabilities.
Also we have that “all pre 1945 is boo boo” mentality planted into every dogooder’s brain and media.


#10

[quote=“JohnMoss”]I hope you are preserving samples of everything you have made, including every headstamp. Above all, collectors are preservationists. So much ammunition has been destroyed or shot up to the last round throughout the world. It is a shame. After all, samples of cartridges are artifacts from the history of mankind’s manufacturing every bit as much as any other item ever made. It reminds me of the story of Springfield Rifle Model 1903 Serial Number One, which was found in combat service in Europe in WWI and basically “stolen” by a military officer and hand-carried back to Springfield Armory, from which it should have never left. Worst of all, from the story which I hope is not a myth, although I wish it were, is that the rifle had already been converted from its original form into the form generally known today as the '03 Springfield. People knowledgeable in U.S. Martial Arms will know what that means, but since I talk too much about guns on this ammo forum, with the firm belief that the subjects of guns and ammunition cannot be separated and make any sense, I will not go into it here.

The point is, that too often, historically important things made by man are not retained either at the manufacturer, such as the first items of any particular object, nor even by the end users (in the case of weaponry, often destroyed in acts of wanton government vandalism) when their usefulness to that user has ended. America is one of the worst about preserving the artifacts of its own history. Without private collectors, many rare and wonderful items in every field would be lost to history.[/quote]

@ John,
I must a done something wrong with the pictures I will try to work this thing out.

Ron F use to say the same thing about me keeping everything…The answer is NO, first because their is so many experiments… Things that do not work go to the garbage bin (a big explosives magazine) After 40 years the one that work well a very few…next in Canada nobody really care I have a lots of visitors (2 or 3 a years ) from all over the world but never had one ( a few in 40) form Canada.
The important thing for a designer is the data…like all the testing and lab report for my 9mm HV AP Or some of the 7.62mm Sniper’s Service rds in use. My Master Sniper .50bmg took more than 10 yrs, 4 years of work to go from 1.6km to 2km but no small target can escape up to 3k now. BUT I do have a few surprise for when I will see an ammo collector…
Regards


#11

Send me the photos to my email and I will post them .
My email is at the bottom of my post.

Glenn


#12

[quote=“Stonewall”]Send me the photos to my email and I will post them .
My email is at the bottom of my post.

Glenn[/quote]

Tank You I will do that…


#13


#14

It looks like a solid copper version of a Hydrashok bullet. I presume the projectile is either all from one piece of copper / beryllium-copper, or that the central pin is a harder material?


#15

My bullet has a shoulder type ogive with a short bearing diameter ballistic path is like a Hornady 88gr hp
The first trial was with solid
next was with Carbide insert
The HP give a lot better penetration than any of the other type
Velocity from MP5 was 1600fps with Nato standard pressure
Metal is proprietary
I will get the original 1/8’’ steel plate use for the first testing and post a picture


#16

The main function of this ammo was to get across glasses in a straight path, after hundreds of rds fire at old cars with target on the seat we never had a malfunction same result with rifles calibers at 500m


#17

Just find an early bullet type when the heat treatment was perfected
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#18

Someone from IAA as come to my shop and pick-up lots of military ammo sample that I design…One of them is in active use in the US Forces

A new and probably the last one in 9mm (from Lepine) is a 9mm very HV (1600fps) expanding soft, with tungsten needle center core

Kevlar penetrating .

Will post picture soon