Lethal or danger zone for blank cartridge

Hi every one
I need some information( manual) for blank cartridge danger zone.
I need for training.
Especially blank small arms danger zone.

What is danger distance of blank cartridge?
And…
Thank alot.

No way anyone can or should post information to reply to that question.

It’s the same as asking if a bullet from a Cal. .30 M-1906 will kill at 10 feet or 1000 yards. Or where does it not kill?

The manufacturer of the blanks being used should be able supply that information. There is NO general rule.

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As a rule of thumb, plastic blank rounds are much safer than any crimped metal design.

Ole

That statement on plastic blank rounds should be modified. Blanks that have a solid plastic bullet, like some Swedish and Danish blanks have had, that use a muzzle device like that for the K-pist. 45 (Garl Gustavs “K-gun” as some Americans have dubbed it) to disintegrate the plastic bullet, can be very dangerous. Years ago, a friend of mine in Sweden reported training accident resulting in death from one of the red-plastic bullet blanks because the soldier who fired it forgot to change barrels on his SMG. I fired one of those blanks, in a little test, through a 1/4" piece of plywood.

Pete is absolutely right, in all respects, about this posting. Every single type of blank probably has a different danger zone if there is anything that leaves the barrel, even a paper wad. There is no possible way to answer the specific question asked, nor should it be attempted on the Forum, in my view.

John Moss

John,
I’m talking about blank cartridges with a burst-open/split-open tip, like the US M200 blank and Norwegian plastic blanks. As in cartridges where a solid/semisolid/crimped front opens up, NOT ones where there is a projectile (which would include also wooden blanks). The Swedish bakelite/thermoplastic blanks are pretty unique in this regard so I hadn’t them in my thought at all.


The arguably safest design is the duckbill design on the 2 cartridges, #9 and #10 from the left. These are Bakelittfabrikken-made, with the design from the original PLAMIL cartridges.

Ole

Ole - thanks for the clarification. I felt that was what you were speaking of, but for the purposes here, it needed clarification.

John

I would wear eye and ear protection. And I would NOT stand in front of the gun… Ever.
I would treat it just like regular ammunition. But after reading this site for a few years, whats regular?

I have to agree with Pete. After nearly 30 years in the US Army - every different blank (cartridge, weapon, caliber, type) has a different “danger zone”. Also, most US military blanks are meant to be fired with a Blank Firing Adapter (BFA) on the weapon. Some weapons (e.g., M16) had at least 3 different versions of BFAs - including what we called the “Hollywood”. Each BFA has a different danger zone, and a weapon fired without at BFA can be deadly at surprising ranges.

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Scarry question for sure. Always make me think of, Bruce Lee’s son, Brandon, who was killed by a blank fired from a handgun on the set of one of his movies.

As said above, there is no answer to this question as there are manyfold systems of blank cartridges and BFDs.
Every single item has to be evaluated on it’s own and there is no general statement that can be made.

hello
for apfsds it not brandon lee who was killed by blank blast ,it’s jon erik hexum
brandon was killed by “dummy stuck bullet” propelled by blank

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Ammogun is correct. In the Brandon Lee case, the revolver was first loaded with dummy cartridges, obviously for a frontal shot where the viewer can see the bullets. Then they were removed from the gun. The prop master must have had a bad morning, or was grossly negligent in not realizing that one of the bulleted dummy cartridges he removed was missing the projectile. It evidently was a little oversized, or distorted, and had lodged in the throat of the cylinder when the cartridges were ejected. A blank was then loaded on top of it, that along with the chamber walls, turned it into a loaded lethal cartridge. Luck of the draw that it was in the chamber first aligned with the barrel when the revolver was cocked or fired in the DA mode. A tragic accident that did not have to occur, if the responsible party had paid close attention to what he was doing.

John Moss

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Thank you, Ammogun & John, for the corrections. Both tragic cases for sure. Sad!

Jason

I know of a case (first hand) when a European spec ops unit was practicing a hostage situ and the guy playing the assassin was using a cut-off 12GA shotgun loaded with a blank. Upon entry of the spec ops folks the actor was to fire the 12GA (loaded with a blank), so he did but not in full accordance to common rules since he aimed it at one of the spec ops guys (normally no blanks are aimed at people there). I do not know about the distance but the 12GA blank blew open the leg artery of that poor guy. If it was not for that they just were flown in by their own chopper which was sitting outside with idling engine which took him immediately (literally minutes) to the near-by hospital the guy would have bled to death.

Funny enough, some manufacturers state a danger zone on the label of their blanks (these were classic star crimped brass if i remember well)
What this distance is actually based upon is up to debate, although i doubt that at 20 meters, a blank in an unobstructed barrel can do any harm

I think manufacturers always try to stay on the safe side and decline any liability if possible.
And as always retarded users have to be considered.

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Detached rose crimp petals of brass/steel can do surprising amounts of damage.

Ole

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