Low pressure and High Pressure Test 9 x 19


#1

These cartridges were loaded at the Toledo plant of the Santa Bárbara company.

The first one is a low pressure test (pressure 20% lower than standard) ordered by the INTA (Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, National Institute for Aerospatial Technique). This is a government owned company. The cartridges were intended for testing armoured cars. Commercial boxes were used for packaging.

The second is a conventional high pressure test round for pistol and submachine gun proof testing.

None of the two types bear distinctive marks, so I guess their collector value is limited. They also would be hard to tell if found out of their boxes.


#2

Hello friend
I am a Spanish collector and only I collect Spanish ammunition, it´s incredible the boxes that you show us, really incredible,
Please, you can contact yourself with me in davrib@hotmail.com it wanted to do some questions,
thanks

david


#3

Schneider - I don’t see why the collector value would be affected. They are what they are - not everything has to have knurls, stripes, cannelures or dots and dashes to be of interest to a student of ammunition. Wish I had them in my little Spanish collection!!! I think all one would need is a xerox of the box labels, front and rear, to go with them. The rear of the boxes are usely dated, and if so, would be as important as the fronts, though.

Nice rounds and beautiful pictures. Thanks for sharing this information with us.


#4

[quote=“JohnMoss”]Schneider - I don’t see why the collector value would be affected. They are what they are - not everything has to have knurls, stripes, cannelures or dots and dashes to be of interest to a student of ammunition. Wish I had them in my little Spanish collection!!! I think all one would need is a xerox of the box labels, front and rear, to go with them. The rear of the boxes are usely dated, and if so, would be as important as the fronts, though.

Nice rounds and beautiful pictures. Thanks for sharing this information with us.[/quote]

You are right, of course. The back of spanish military pistol ammo boxes is usually dated, but I don’t post photos if the date is visible on the case heads.


#5

Schneider - The only importance of the back-label date in this case would be so that if the boxes were broken, and cartridges ended up as singles in other collections, the xerox copies of the labels supplied to the new owners of those cartridges would agree with the headstamp dates and show, therefore, a relationship to them. I agree 100% that nromally, there is not need to show it, and I would not have bothered here either.

Of course, in ammunition in general, the headstamp date relates only to the headstamp on the case, and sometimes can be one or even more years off from the loading date. I have not encountered that in Spanish pistol ammunition, however, that I can recall at least.

Thanks again for the posting.

John Moss


#6

[quote=“JohnMoss”]
Of course, in ammunition in general, the headstamp date relates only to the headstamp on the case, and sometimes can be one or even more years off from the loading date. I have not encountered that in Spanish pistol ammunition, however, that I can recall at least.
John Moss[/quote]

John, at the end of this tread

viewtopic.php?f=8&t=7202

you can see cartridges loaded in 1981 with 1982 headstamped cases. Although these did not belong to a regular contract.


#7

Schneider - I had not noticed that, even though the text explains it. Interesting. I have seen a few other instances of ammunition loaded earlier than the date on the headstamp. These are almost always done very late in the year, when a run of cases having the next year’s headstamp has been made, but are loaded right away, before the lst of the next year. I suspect that this doesn’t happen much, but you are right on - it does happen!

Its always important to remember that the headstamp on a small-arms cartridge usually only tells us about the case, and seldom anything at all about the loading or when it was loaded, except perhaps in cases of companies that only load one kind of specialty ammunition. The KTW headstamp, for example, tells us along with the projectile that is high-penetration ammunition (unless the case has been reloaded).

Headstamps are interesting - my favorite subject in cartridge collecting. I would rather get an ordinary ball cartridge with a completely new headstamp for my collection, that the rarest exotic load with an ordinary headstamp (that is NOT to say I don’t like to get the latter, also, but rather just a preference), because I am basically a headstamp collector at heart.

John Moss


#8

Thanks for the information! Very interesting cartridges. Would like to have samples in my collection but at least have the photos with the boxes. Many thanks for posting this.

Lew