M20 +2 ?


#1

Demilled with 2 dummy rounds.

Guy wants $800. Does the price sound right?

Thanks


#2

Claiming nothing more than comparable interest in items such as this, the $800 wouldn’t be too far out of line, considering the +2 part. An aside, the safing clips noted on the rounds are a much sought after item. Figuring the rounds are worth probably $100 per, and from the looks of things in fine restored condition, I’d be pleased to have it propped in the corner with some of my other stuff. Bad time of year, though, to be blowing $800. For me anyway. As in: Hey honey, look what I got you for Christmas! Them sharp edges and protruding bits might be painful.
Here’s a couple of pics, to whet your interest even more:




#3

Hey Rick

I’ve heard that it’s a little less painful each time. No personal experience - just what I’ve been told.

How does one get all the pieces to make a complete round? And what’s that red “wire” in the base?

Ray


#4

Roger on the disclaimer.

As for “assembling” an example, mine came as pictured. Most I’ve seen are complete. Generally. The safing clip being absent in most all cases. As for the wire, there’s actually two, the other being black. Part of the ignition system. Leads to a squib that sets things in motion. The wires would be longer, out of the shipping tube, and wrapped round contacts on the rear of the launcher. Then you’d pat the head of the shooter and get to the side.


#5

Hey, Guys…Just out of curiosity, what is the age of this thing ?

Randy


#6

[quote=“SlickRick”]Roger on the disclaimer.

As for “assembling” an example, mine came as pictured. Most I’ve seen are complete. Generally. The safing clip being absent in most all cases. As for the wire, there’s actually two, the other being black. Part of the ignition system. Leads to a squib that sets things in motion. The wires would be longer, out of the shipping tube, and wrapped round contacts on the rear of the launcher. Then you’d pat the head of the shooter and get to the side.[/quote]

Rick, I would be inclined to get to one side THEN pat the shooter on the head!

gravelbelly


#7

Randy,

The typical vintage is Korean War era and later. This 3.5" was put into use as the smaller 2.36" WWII version didn’t get it done on the Soviet tanks that rolled south of the 38th. An example of the rocket I have is dated 12-53 on the fuze (complete with safty band I’ll add just to make Rick jealous).

Dave


#8

Randy first, on the age thing, mine is dated as follows:
Warhead 10-68
Fuze 2-54
Rocket motor 2-54
Obviously using old stock for training, although my warhead appears to have never been launched. Not scruffed up at all.

Gravelbelly. You are correct, sir. There are old bazooka loaders, and there are bold bazooka loaders. . . .

DaveE. Yes. I am.


#9

[quote=“SlickRick”]Bad time of year, though, to be blowing $800. For me anyway. As in: Hey honey, look what I got you for Christmas! Them sharp edges and protruding bits might be painful.[/quote]Yes, OUCH! This is my dilemma, while I’m sure my son would view the items as the perfect compliment to our Christmas tree…I highly doubt the wife and daughter would agree.

Any ideas on how to fit these lovely devices into the ‘12 Days of Christmas’?
Maybe right after the ‘Turtle Doves’?


#10

I dont know what the launcher goes for but I have picked up many 3.5 rounds in the past for $30 at most $40 around


#11

I defer to Joel’s pricing. Got mine in a trade, without discussing a $ value. The safing clips, mentioned earlier, would kick that $30-40 price up a bit. If it was me selling it, that’d be the case.

Anyway, I’d like to rescind and clarify some previous input re: the wire(s). And profess a less than expert status in regards to bazooka technology. A little more looking around on the intertubes and closer inspection of my sample proved that the old wrap the wires around some terminals on the back of the bazooka tube is WRONG! At least with this model. The two rings, brass and aluminum, noted on the fin end are what make the electrical connection. The wires eminate from under the fin “wrap” and proceed to a squib in contact with the rocket motor propellant. An obvious improvement over the WW2 vintage system.

Here’s proof:


#12

Hi, All…Reason I asked the age a few posts ago…Recently watched…again…Band of Brothers…I believe the episode was Carentan…or maybe the following one…German armor came over the ridge, and the “Bazooka” fellows got out into the open to fire at the armor…and the firer was pleading with the loader to “Hurry the hell up”…appeared the loader was connecting wires…but I thought our Bazookas in WW2 were the type where the loader shoved the rocket in from the rear and gave the firer the “pat on the shoulder”…and “WHOOSH”…Enlighten a poor .30-40 Krag Collector, please…Randy


#13

Here you go…

The WW2 Bazooka has 2 wires that hooked to the launcher. The launcher had an electro-piezo(?spelling) or battery trigger. You squeezed the “trigger” and it sent a electric current to the rocket igniting the fuel in the rocket motor.

In the later 3.5" “Super Bazooka” the the early models had the similar system where a wire was wrapped around a connector plate and an electric current ignited the motor. As it developed they got rid of the connector plate and had a latch that was swung down into position after the rocket was loaded, thereby eliminating the need to “wrap” the wire. The early rockets have 3 wires. A long blue one was for the wrapping. The other two connected the copper band (ground) to the motor.


#14

Are there any major differences difference between what the ‘good guys’ use(d) Bazooka and what the ‘bad guys’ use RPG?

Obviously I’m attributing RPG’s to the ‘bad guys’, because that’s the way they’re portrayed by the news media.


#15

Hi
I have this one used by the Dutch Army.
The black colour indicate that it is a practice / dummy grenade


#16

Nice rocket :)

You wouldn’t have a nice Dutch manual for the launcher kicking around would you…


#17

I will look for a Dutch manual !!!

regards
gyrojet