MAGTECH Manufacture Dates


#1

A quick look at my Magtech ammo and primer boxes convinced me that the lot numbers are, in fact, date of manufacture. The form of Magtech lot numbers is LL#### with L being a letter and # being a number. The first two letters equate to the year, the first two numbers are the month 01 thru 12, and the last two numbers are the numerical date 01 thru 31. BL0226 equates to 26 February 2008. Although I have boxes with lot numbers predating 2000, I don’t yet have a continuous string like the following:
BC - 2000
BD - 2001
BE - 2002
BF - 2003
BG - 2004
BH - 2005
BI - 2006
BJ - 2007
(BK - skipped)
BL - 2008
BM - 2009
BK skipped because in Portugese, the official language of Brazil where Magtech is, there is no K.


#2

d’Artagnon - great job figuring out those Magtech/CBC lot numbers. Good information. Will make it much easier to date this stuff later.

I don’t want to nitpick, but I think its really important to keep company ID’s correct. Magtech is actually an American Firm, or is a firm located in America (I corrected myself because I don’t know who has stock control for them), not Brazil. The Ammunition they sold is made by Companhia Brasileira de Cartuchos, of Ribeir


#3

The “RIO” brand of shotshells for Hunting and Competition use is a trademark of the UEE (Union Espanoles de Esplosivos), the Spanish Government Explosives manufacturer ( formerly “ERT” ( “Esplosivos Rio Tinto”) a Firm producing explosives for the International Mining industries.
It was re-organised into “UEE” some ten years ago, by combining several Government powder factories and civilian Industrial explosives plants. I think the Spanish (Socialist) government still has a large financial interest in the combine.

They make a full range of Shotshells, as well as Shotshell primers and Shotshell Reloading Powders.

Years ago CBC sold under its own name in the USA, but legalities etc caused it to form a “company” with a US registration to act as “Importer and distributor” of its products in the USA under a US Brand name (for Customs and Public Liability reasons). “Magtech” has been in existance some ten to 15 years now.
CBC still markets under its own Label in many parts of the world, but a lot of its products are packed in “Magtech” labelled Packets ( still marked “Made in Brazil” and with CBC style headstamps.)

CBC also has a good Military contract presence world wide, outbidding many US and European Suppliers especially in the Third world.

Even Australia bought several Million rounds of CBC 2000 9x19 ammo, and the Troops found it was just as good as the more costly WCC (US made) 9mm ammo…but some " anti" comments(from Bureaucrats) about “third world production from Brazil” made that supply a One-off. Obviously our Defence procurement is just as corrupt ( or incompetent, or both) as that in many “third world” countries.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#4

Its a shame some people don’t judge a product by its quality, rather than their misperceptions about the country that makes it. We ran into initial sales problems when we first put in some FNM 7.62 NATO ammo from Portugal. However, in three of my rifles, a 40XBBR Heavy Varmint Class, an FN FAL, and a match-grade M1A, it shot rings around Lake City Match ammo at 100 meters, even though it was ordinary ball. Our customers ended up loving it.

The same happened when we got some CAVIM 7 x 57m/m ammo from Venezuela (Pre-Hugo Chavez, of course). Until I put targets that a friend of mine and I show with this supurb ammunition near the ammo, for clerks to show people, we got sales resistence. After they saw the targets, they tried it and loved it. To this day, it is the best 7m/m ammo I have shot in my Venezuelan Mauser. I have a handload the matches its accuracy, but not one that bests it, although admittedly, I have experimented very little with this since it is an open-sight full-military rifle.

As to CBC Ammunition, in all calibers I have tried - 7.62 x 39, .223, .380 Auto, 9mm, .45 and probably others, it has been the equal of anything on the Market. The 9mm runds perfectly through my FN GP pistol with excellent accuracy. I have had a few rounds that seem to beat it for accuracy, but not to any point where it would matter in the real world. It is good stuff.

The most accurate 9 x 18m/m Makarov ammunition I have fired, based on firing in four different pistols, one from each country, has been the Chinese.
It shoots great, best in my Chinese Makarov shooter, probably due to just a perfect blend of specs between the pistol and the ammo, but it is outstanding in my DDR, Russian, and Bulgarian shooters as well.

The can’t judge ammo by prejudice against the country or region it comes from.


#5

Isn’t it now illegal in the USA to import any guns or ammo from China? I have read on other forums that it was really good 9x18 ammo and they wish they could get more of it.


#6

Falcon - yes, it is illegal to import most Chinese firearms items now, including pistol ammo. My experience with Chinese ammo has been that calibers made for the Chinese military are excellent quality while those not used in China, but made only for commercial export, is surefire but mediocre. Not based on any scientific observation - just my own casual use when you could get lots of calibers.

The import was stopped supposedly to punish China for some transgression or another. Of course, you know and I know it was done to simply further restrict access to American citizens. Many much more important (to China) export goods were not restricted from importation. Just another way to harrass and deprive the American gun owner.


#7

Somebody needs to set up a company in Europe or elsewhere, and convince the Chinese to manufacture arms (at a price) with the European company’s names on. Could they then then be imported into the USA?


#8

Falcon - Probably not! For example, to import a Russian pistol into the U.S. now, say a Makarov, you have to be able to prove it has not been in the USSR or Russia for “X” number of years. It used to be five years, but I think they increased that, although I could be wrong. So, if you tried to import one from Russia, it would be refused. If you could prove it had been in, say, Bulgaria for the required number of years, you could import it (if you can show it was used by Bulgarian Police, and not the military). You still cannot import any military firearm made after 1945, I believe (Gun Control Act of 1968). They can be the same exact weapon as military, but you have to prove they were police guns. This is usually done by a letter from the exporting authority. I have a copy of such a letter, for example, from the German Police regarding DDR Makarovs sold for export to America.

Some of the countries lie like stepchildren. A Chinese customer of mine, who serve many years in the Communist Chinese Army and was very well versed in their weaponry - far beyond the average soldier - went through our rack years ago when we had about twenty SKS Carbines out there, from China, and from the serial number style, indicated about half were police and about half were military. The military requires a specific style of serial number that includes a date code, it seems, where the police numbers are different. Those guns had been imported by another retail store across the Bay from us, and I know they had a “Police use only” letter from the Chinese Government.

Interestingly, when the guns arrived, just stacked loose in a cargo container,
they were in poorer condition than the ones shown to them in China, and some were found to be loaded!!! There were some Mauser pistols also, and two of those were loaded. They had an accidental discharge with one. The guns were full of cosmoline and the clerk didn’t see the cartridge on the top when he opened the bolt. Luckily, no one was hurt. The shipment contained bandoleers of ammo, both live and dummy, in 7.62 x 39. They were the first Chinese dummy 7.62 x 39 rounds I had hever seen, and I still have some of them left. They gave me a whole bunch of them for my trade stock, since we bought about 50 of the rifles. Customs didn’t gripe about the ammo or seize it - most of it was buried under the mountain of rifles, and they accepted the true fact that the Importer didn’t known anything about the ammo being put in the container.

This is probably why many of the importers of Chinese weaponry have had problems with US Authorities in the past. You never knew what the heck was going to be in your shipment. We never even attempted to bring anything from China - was safet and easier to buy it from someone who did.


#9

[quote=“JohnMoss”]d’Artagnon - great job figuring out those Magtech/CBC lot numbers. Good information. Will make it much easier to date this stuff later.

I don’t want to nitpick, but I think its really important to keep company ID’s correct. Magtech is actually an American Firm, or is a firm located in America (I corrected myself because I don’t know who has stock control for them), not Brazil. The Ammunition they sold is made by Companhia Brasileira de Cartuchos, of Ribeir