Mailing Inert Cartridges


#1

Here we go again.

On a shooting Forum there is a big discussion going on about mailing gun parts, components, etc through the US Mail to other countries. One guy is making some very good arguements that it is strictly against U.S. State Department rules to mail such things as inert cartridges. He feels that we are risking a lot each time we do it even though the USPS and US Customs seem to permit it. I’m beginning to believe him.

We’ve kicked this around several times but I’ve never felt that we have come to any conclusions. I’m too pretty to go to prison. I don’t want to risk it for a few inert cartridges.

What do you guys here in the USA think, again?

Ray


#2

Ray

Done some ord stuff and haven’t had any issues. Nary a one. Much ado about nothing, me thinks. Of course, that could all change tomorrow.

Forget the name of the movie. Pryor was in it. And I think Feldman., Anyway, when they were sent to prison, they strutted in saying: Yea, we bad! We bad! You could try that. And scowl. Scowling will help. Screaming and crying won’t.


#3

Rick

I think it was Stir Crazy?

I’ve mailed a lot of inert cartridges myself without, as you say, any issues. But if you look at the State Department rules there is no doubt that military equipment includes cartridge cases and bullets and it doesn’t say anything about a line where 5 are OK but 6 are SME (Significant Military Equipment). I’m not sure that USPS workers know if mailing inert cartridges is OK or not nor would they know how to ID an inert. Trusting them may be unwise.

I’m not being paranoid. I just think that you can’t trust anyone now-a-days and who knows when some nameless bureaucrat may be having a Blue Monday and decide to drop the hammer.

Ray


#4

The truth is you could probably get away with mailing anything for quite a long time simply because the chances of it being detected is low. Thats not the same as it being legal, it just means you got away with it.

However, my opinion regarding the mailing of inert ammunition in the UK is that the authorities never considered the possibility that a bunch of geeks would want to do so. I would imagine US and other authorities are in much the same position.

As I understand it in UK the carriage of (live)ammunition is banned by the postal service’s internal rules and not law. However, the purchase of ammunition by any form of mail order is illegal unless you have a dealer to dealer transaction. There lies the problem, what is and what isn’t ammunition?

Most regulations just say ammunition they don’t say live ammunition. Does that mean inert ammunition is included or excluded? You then get into the situation of what I call creeping regulation where, because of uncertainty, people revert to an over cautious interpretation and by default the answer becomes no.

Also, because of the present hysteria regarding terrorism, any petty official who detects a potential anomoly is liable to hit the red button rather than just query it with you. Thats the real danger because once these things get going they tend to have no reverse gear.

Anyway Ray, if you should go to jail its not so bad. No bills to pay, three meals a day…


#5

. . . .Bruce.


#6

Someone has agreed to send me one wildcat rifle round from the USA, so I’ve asked him not only to make sure it has no propellant or primer but also has a hole drilled in one side of the case and is covered with labels saying INERT DUMMY, CANNOT BE LOADED, FOR REFERENCE AND DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. I hope that’ll help if anyone takes a peek…


#7

I’ve never had any problem as the recipient of inerted cartridges here in the UK however, if I’m mailing cartridges internally or overseas, I’ll put a printed note into the package which I hope might just swing the balance in my favour should the package be intercepted. It’s very easy to do and may just make all the difference. Something along the lines of;

[b]To whom it may concern,
These cartridges are intended for collecting and research purposes only and can no longer be fired, The bullets have been pulled, the powder has been disposed of, and the primers have been desensitized by oiling. They are inert and contain no explosive material whatsoever. They comply with postal regulations and are completely safe to transport within the mail system.[b]

Jim


#8

[quote=“RayMeketa”]Here we go again.

On a shooting Forum there is a big discussion going on about mailing gun parts, components, etc through the US Mail to other countries. One guy is making some very good arguements that it is strictly against U.S. State Department rules to mail such things as inert cartridges. He feels that we are risking a lot each time we do it even though the USPS and US Customs seem to permit it. I’m beginning to believe him.

We’ve kicked this around several times but I’ve never felt that we have come to any conclusions. I’m too pretty to go to prison. I don’t want to risk it for a few inert cartridges.

What do you guys here in the USA think, again?

Ray[/quote]

Best old saying I know of: " DON’T ASK, DON"T TELL"
Maybe this isn’t a technical subject ?
Less print on it the better.


#9

I “mail” nothing that reseambles a cartridge (US Parcal Post)…I UPS 100%…even if inert…I will place a label “inert military display item” on the outside. But it still baffles me the items I recieve in the “mail”.


#10

This is interesting to me not as a collector but because I worked for UPS for 31 years (retired in Oct.). The last five years I worked inside the bldg.
It is amazing what people will try and get away with on the “don’t ask don’t tell” policy (which you can’t get away with anymore). And almost always whatever the contents are if the shipper wants to hide it and ship it anyway, the shipper will always do something with the return address, make it fake, not put it on the package at all.
A lot of times they will also ship drugs and put “kids stickers” on the outside like teddy bears ect. and write “happy brithday Jimmy.” To throw us off maybe?, RIGHT, it don’t work, red flags everywhere.
I seen one like this about 12 months ago a package was being returned to the shipper (maybe the consignee lost his cool and would not accept it) but the return add was correct for the street name but the number was nowhere. The other clerk opened it up and it was black tar herion (not that I know what it looks like). But my point somebody could have and does at times put a note in that says “this is a arrowhead that is not been formed yet” whatever, to many red flags!! the clerk calls the boss the boss calls the cops, and the cops show up with some dogs and heavy eqip. ect and the cops make out what is going on.
And my other point I wanted to make is about 4 months ago the clerk had a busted open package because it was a heavy one it had come apart so she started to rebox it. She looked a me with wide eyes and said this is a “box of grenades!!” CALL THE COPS. I walked over and seen right away it was from a large catalog company and yes they were inert grenades and legal. It took me a while to keep her from calling the cops.
And if it is International shipment EVERTHING IS CHECKED it don’t need any red flags because they are the highest money maker packages so the company wants to make sure it gets there before it leaves and they also start the customs paper work there before it leaves our bldg.
My two cents


#11

I posted about my experience with this on the old board. My story boils down to Customs opening a box of inert cartridges coming to me from Europe. They took about half of it and let me have the rest. They ended up giving me the stuff they confiscated after I gave them permission to drill holes in the sides of them. It took quite a while for this to happen.