Maxim belt


#1

Is this Maxim belt British? It is marked BN 12 17. All metal parts of the belt are steel.


#2

As a footnote to my question above and probably doesn


#3

[quote=“pbutler”]Is this Maxim belt British? It is marked BN 12 17. All metal parts of the belt are steel.

[/quote]

pbutler,

I cannot identify the maker of your belt but I doubt that it is British. The reason for this impression is the solid rivets at the tips of the long metal strips. Britain used eyelets whereas Germany used solid rivets.

gravelbelly


#4

[quote=“gravelbelly”][quote=“pbutler”]Is this Maxim belt British? It is marked BN 12 17. All metal parts of the belt are steel.

[/quote]

pbutler,

I cannot identify the maker of your belt but I doubt that it is British. The reason for this impression is the solid rivets at the tips of the long metal strips. Britain used eyelets whereas Germany used solid rivets.

gravelbelly[/quote]

There are existing German belts which look exactly like the one pictured here. I assume Jean-Francois will come up with a proper ID.


#5

Hello,

this belt is definitively German WW1 production. So far, BN has been identified as “Firma Bing in Nurnberg”.
This maker has been observed dated early 1917 to mid 1918.

Cheers,

JFL


#6

Definitely German.
The “BN” is actually “Gebruder Bing, Nurnberg”. Bing Brothers had been stamped Tinplate Toy makers of Nuremberg since the mid-1800s.
During WW I, their sheetmetal stamping technology was converted to making all sorts of pressed and stamped out sheet steel parts and accessories for the German War effort…Examples,
GBN marked Magazine bottom covers for the Gew 88/05, dated 1914 (prevent trench mud from entering the mechanism); TrommelMagazines for FliegerSelbsladerKarabiner M1915 (Mondragon rifles)“snail drum” 7x57mm mags; other types of Snail drums ( Pistole 08 and 08Lange, and Bergmann M18;)
Action covers for Gew98 and Kar98a, and sundry other non-gun metal bits.
I have not noted any Cartridge stripper clips marked GBN or BN, buth they are probably out ther, unrecognised.

Bing was famous in Model & Toy Train circles for its Steam powered and Accumulator Powered Large scale “toy” Trains, from the 1890s till the 1930s, as well as many othewr “Tinplate Toys” of the Imperial period.

As the firm (“Firma”) had Jewish connections, I think it disappeared in the 1930s…any further information would be welcomed here.

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#7

My thanks to all for the information.