Military Ordnance and Ammunition Collection Photos II

If you like big ordnance done in a big way it is hard to beat the Russian Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Engineers and Signal Corps, located in St. Petersburg, Russia. I was initially refused permission three times for a formal visit, then a Belorussian co-worker that “knew someone” managed to pull some strings and get us a week of “big-bullet heaven”.
It was a challenging visit, with language issues, my helper-translator not being an ordnance person (a whole language by itself) and 75 years of distrust and suspicion to overcome. Many times throughout the week I was challenged for “straying off-topic” from the stated purposes of the visit and either discussing or photographing other ordnance. Eventually the Curator broke down though, I think he was having as difficult a time as I was, and having someone with an in-depth interest in his pride and joy was too much to hold back from. Another fantastic collection.

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Now that is awesome. More please.
Zac

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What are those old cannons with NON-round muzzles? Is there any way to get a close-up of description plaques? I’ll translate them, if I can read them.

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https://www.artillery-museum.ru/en/main-exposition/the-history-of-russian-artillery-since-the-mid19th-century-up-to-1917.html

Quote:

“The few guns worked out by N. Maievskii, A. Adrianov, A. Plestsov and I. Miasoedov prove that Russian designers found new bold technical innovations. These guns were intended for firing disk shots (samples of ammunition are displayed, as well). It was expected that the usage of disk shots would considerably improve the firing range. It turned out really to be so, and the firing range became five times longer in comparison smooth­bore guns. However, the new guns did not enter service because of their wide shot dispersion and impossibility of using impact fuses. In addition, minimal effectiveness was found for shots in which only a small amount of the explosive went in.”

“О том, что русские конструкторы находили новые смелые технические решения, свидетельствует несколько орудий, разработанных Н.В.Маиевским, А.А.Адриановым, А.И.Плесцовым и И.В.Мясоедовым, для стрельбы дисковыми снарядами (здесь же представлены образцы боеприпасов к ним). Ожидалось, что применение дисковых снарядов позволит значительно увеличить дальность стрельбы (и действительно, по сравнению с гладкоствольными орудиями она возросла в 5 раз), но эти орудия на вооружение приняты не были, поскольку выявились их отрицательные стороны: большое рассеивание снарядов, невозможность применения взрывателей ударного действия и малая эффективность снарядов, в которые вмещалось небольшое количество взрывчатого вещества.”

Note the red arrow added to USSubs’ photo pointing to examples of disk shot.

Brian

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Do we have images of these? For some reason I saw plenty of photos from there but never the said projectiles.

I may have some more pictures of them somewhere, still digging. Like so many of the older museums the lighting there for photography is absolutely horrible. Much of the are is very dark, with spots that are very bright. Photoshop can fix much, but it starts to get spotty on the darkest areas.

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Enlarged section of USSubs’ photo from above, the disk projectiles are under the red arrow.

Below is a better photo of the disk projectiles shown at the museum, from:

Above photo with some adjustments to brightness and contrast:

PS-

Here is another photo of the disk projectiles, from:
https://forummg.info/viewtopic.php?t=1127

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Note that from this angle one can see what appear to be 2 filling plugs (?) or a filling plug and a fuze or ??? in the center projectile, as pointed out by the red arrow.

6_11, a

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AMAZING! Thanks for sharing these- along with the others.

Cool canons and tanks with BIG guns!
Thabks!!

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Jeff,
I looked up this museum’s website. It appears they have regular museum hours and there is no indication that attendance is restricted. How come you had so much trouble getting inside?

Brian, thanks a lot !!!
I missed these it seems.

When you start taking more photos than just occassional snapshots with your phone you always will run into problems.
Speaking from experience…

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I guess it depends on what a formal visit is compared to regular visitor hours. Also, Jeff doesn’t say when he was visiting. The museum may have had tighter visitation restrictions at the time. To me it does sound like the visits were disallowed well before Jeff set foot on the site or pulled out his camera, so it will be interesting to hear the story…

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It also depends in which capacity one is travelling and what the visa was issued for.
If you come as an arms inspector the whole procedure is changing by 180°.

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