Modern machined solid-copper-hollow-points


#1

Working on my SLICS table display / book for pistol-caliber solid copper hollow points, and I thought I would post this lineup photo showing all of the modern precision machine-lathed copper hollow point types being made in the U.S. presently. These are all done on high-speed computer controlled lathes, unlike the more common press-formed Barnes, Magtech, and General Bullet projectiles which have been around for several more years.

From left to right, they are:

  1. .45acp 155gr Ithaca “I.E.P.”
  2. .45acp 155gr Ithaca “I.F.P.”
  3. .50GI 230gr Guncrafter Industries “C.H.P”
  4. .45acp 170gr Lehigh Defense “Controlled Fracturing”
  5. .45acp 174gr Lehigh Defense “Maximum Expansion”
  6. .45acp 166gr G2 “R.I.P”
  7. .45acp 150gr Cutting Edge Bullet “PHD”
  8. .45acp 175gr Grizzly “Xtreme” (probably made by Lehigh)

#2

looks great Matt

Harrie


#3

Forgot to add a couple; the two versions of top projectiles in the stacked multi-projectile solid-copper loads from Lehigh. These are technically SCHP as well, and below shows the .45 Colt top projectile (center), and the now discontinued .45acp top tubular ring projectile (right). The projectile at left is the Grizzly Xtreme .45acp bullet from the first photo for relative scale.


#4

[quote=“DKConfiguration”]Working on my SLICS table display / book for pistol-caliber solid copper hollow points, and I thought I would post this lineup photo showing all of the modern precision machine-lathed copper hollow point types being made in the U.S. presently. These are all done on high-speed computer controlled lathes, unlike the more common press-formed Barnes, Magtech, and General Bullet projectiles which have been around for several more years.
[/quote]
Not to be pedantic, but the correct term here would be “lathe-turned”. “Lathed” or “lathing” are not terms that are usually used in the industry.


#5

Thanks Falcon. I just did a keyword search through the .pdf of my just-completed (and already off to the printer) 100-page SCHP book, and luckily I did not use the term “machine lathed” in it. I did use the term “precision lathed” and “machined” in places though. Doing a Google search on “machine lathed” in quotes, it only returned 2400 results, so apparently that is a not-oft used / incorrect term. The word “lathed” by itself however, appears plenty, and has a Webster’s definition. Maybe it’s a British English vs American English thing?


#6

I tried searching for “lathed” and couldn’t find the definition.

However, “lathing” has another use. This is the process of applying lath, which is a term used in construction for material used as a base for plaster.


#7

The term “Lathed” does appear in my Webster’s Dictionary, Falcon, as another form of the word “lathe” rather than as a separate entry. The term “Lathe” by itself can be a noun or a verb. Your comment was interesting as I never thought of the term in the sense of “lath and plaster.” Easy to confuse. But then, whoever said the English language was easy or even always logical.