More sectioned ammo


#1

I did some more sectioning today (see photo below): It was a simple procedure, but can’t go into how i did it. Sorry about the useless photo.

Top: .303 Ball, was headstamped “F N 52”, Brass case, lead come gM Jacketed FMJ Boat Tail bullet.

Bottom Left: German WW2 7.92x57 Lead cored, GMCS jacketed sS Type ball bullet.

Bottom Right: Italian lead cored brass jacketed 9mm FMJ bullet.


#2

That looks very good!

I love sectioned ammo and would like all of my collection sectioned (although preferably with a 120 degree section cut out rather than a 180 degree cut). But I just don’t have the patience to do it.


#3

Hello Falcon…NICE JOB!!..I’ve done many myself !!


#4

Years ago collectors considered sectioning to be DAMAGE ! I had several instances of folks offering 1/3 or 1/2 the price of a full cartridge because a part was cut away.

I have always collected the sectioned ammo.

My mentor and old friend Charlie Yust advised getting 3 of each specimen if possible; one to keep as issued, one to take apart into components and one to section. Not always possible with rare rounds but a good idea if possible and affordable.


#5

Boy, you guys are really making me eat my words about sectioned cartridges, from a past thread. I said I liked sectioned cartridges and have a few, but would take a full loaded round over one anyday. Hmmmmm! Maybe another case of me "engaging big mouth, not engaging little brain.

Falcon, great efforts for a first time. I wouldn’t dare try that. I am not worried about catastrophe - it is just that I know I would screw it up!

I agree, though, with the idea that with common, affordable specimens, if one can keep a loaded one and section one. I also have a lot of dupes I have broken down to components, but most of those were done as a result of LE inquiries seeking information in criminal cases. That is what I have done in most cases, although a friend presented me with a sectioned 9mm that to this day, five years later, I have not been able to find a loaded one. Know what, after reading what you guys have to say, and thinking about what these sectioned rounds teach us, I no longer care that I can’t find a loaded one!


#6

I will keep you posted, I have some more common specimens which would make good sectioned rounds.


#7

Wouldn


#8

I own many sectioned rounds but have never sectioned anything and would not. There are plenty of pros. and gifted non-pros to do that.

My staff sectioner (the late Wayne Markov of Norton Ohio) was one of the best but ended up in the hospital twice from sectioning accidents. He often started with a LIVE round and starting to cut or grind on something which is designed to KILL you is really NOT a good idea.

Explosive ordnance which is not sectioned can NEVER be trusted. The EOD basic rule is : IF YOU CAN NOT SEE INTO IT - IT IS LIVE.

During WW2 a chrome plated display German “S” mine on display at the Navy Yard in DC functioned and killed and injured several folks. Booby trap ? Maybe.

Most sectioned rounds are totally “defanged” although even they may have live primers or fuze parts .

Sectioned rounds made from factory unloaded parts are always the best to own.

Saint Barbara is the paron saint of artillery and ordnance and we should all offer up prayers for those fellows who cut this stuff for our edification.

The best of luck and remember to save any blown off body parts as they are doing wonders with reattachment these days. ALWAYS WEAR GOOD EYE PROTECTION AS THOSE ARE NOT EASY TO REPLACE !


#9

I entirely endorse the need for caution, even with rifle bullets. The Japanese made some 7.7mm and 7.92mm HE bullets which had no fuze, just impact-sensitive PETN under a thin nose cap. You do not want to have your fingers wrapped around one of those if it blows.


#10

Preserving the headstamp seems to be my only concern. I guess you could decide which is more important; the contents or the headstamp.


#11

Very much so. Anyone interested in the topic of these common but very dangerous shells can request a free copy of my article " Common ammunition Uncommon dangers"- US only please.


#12

I try to collect two of all my crtgs, and if I have two (only then!) I make one sectioned.
Some type’s I do not by myself, like Beo Patrone, but the rest will do fine.
I always keep the bottom intact because I want to keep the original headstamp.


#13

Jaco - nice job! That’s the way I would section cartridges, if I had the skill to do it all (which I don’t), keeping the headstamp totally intact. Only if I thought there was something special to see in the web of the case or the primer area, would I section down farther, but even then, if possible, I would keep the headstamp in tact even if it meant the head was very thin. Of course, not sectioning rounds, I don’t know if that is practical or even possible.

I once said on this Forum I would much rather have a whole cartridge than a sectioned one. I almost wish my whole collection was section like the way Jaco did it. It is more interesting to see the whole construction of the cartridge, and it also removes them from the purview of most of the laws against ammo in various places. You guys who love these sectioned rounds won me over!


#14

John
Thank you for the compliments, but I don’t have 12000+ crdtgs like you have.
But I find out the inside is often a lot more interesting than the outside. It’s sometimes a lot of work, but nice to do.

In Holland a sectioned cartridges however are still forbidden under the law… It’s still part of ammunition, law consider it as “even mentioned to be shot from a gun”.

This one was a lot of work, .303 (headstamp RL 1943 B IV Z). Has Phosphorus in the small canals at the lower part of the projectile.
Ph. on the photo has been coloured in with PSP, I yet had no time to put coloured candlelight wax in it.


#15

As a certifiable sectioneer myself, I would love to see a photo gallery of Forum member’s collections. I’d contribute mine also.

When we speak of sectioning “cartridges” we are really talking 90% bullets and 10% cases. The bullet is where the interest lies. I marvel at the construction of the compound specimens. Take the one that Jaco posted above. Can you imagine the ingenuity involved in assembling that bullet?

Ray


#16

In case anyone’s interested, the .303" B Mk IV round shown nicely sectioned above was based on the WW1 Buckingham incendiary tracer. It was formally classified as an incendiary (which is what the “B” designated) but as it ignited on firing instead of on impact, it left a smoke trail and was used as a day tracer. It was replaced as the RAF’s main .303 incendiary bullet from mid-1940 onwards by the B Mk VI (usually dubbed “De Wilde” but greatly modified by Major Dixon) which ignited on impact and was much more effective. The B Mk IV was then used in smaller quantities, mainly for its tracer effect.


#17

Thank you for the additional information Tony.
Grtz
Jaco


#18

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]As a certifiable sectioneer myself, I would love to see a photo gallery of Forum member’s collections. I’d contribute mine also.
When we speak of sectioning “cartridges” we are really talking 90% bullets and 10% cases. The bullet is where the interest lies. I marvel at the construction of the compound specimens. Take the one that Jaco posted above. Can you imagine the ingenuity involved in assembling that bullet?
Ray[/quote]

I agree with that Ray, it should be a very nice database, and, as last days proved, some questions can been answered because a picture of sectioned bullets.
I’ll contribute too.


#19

It would be awesome to have a section just for pictures of sectioned rounds!! I have some nice large bore sectioned items from 25MM to 120MM to add (all of the discarding sabot type) if that goes down :-)

I would love to see videos of how ammunition factories make ammunition and their components, especially the projectile part. Some of these sectioned projectiles show such complicated internal and ingenious manufacturing.

Jason