Mselect - CartWin - Other Cartridge collecting programs


#1

I did a search on the forum and this topic was (sort of) discussed before. Mostly it was general comments about catalog software and was dated several years ago. Besides the information being dated, it really wasn’t much help.

I would like any input from members (non-members too!) that have any experience with either Mslect or CartWin. Mslect is about $210.00 and I understand that IAA members can purchase CartWin for a special price of $260.00. I’ve attempted to contact CartWin about the special price several weeks ago, but have not received any reply as of yet.

I realize that there are other numerous programs that can be used/modified specifically for cartridge collecting, but I’m lazy! I’m interested in getting a program designed for cartridge collection. Unlike some friends of mine (I won’t mention John Moss) that have a quadrillion cartridges in their collections, I don’t have that problem. But I would like to get a program started while the input is not too daunting.

Or is there something better than Mselect or CartWin available? Any input would be appreciated.

Jones


#2

Jones,
There is a program available that works great ( egun.de/market/item.php?id=2896674 )
but it`s in german, but all the things you need to fill in you can use your own language.
Special designed for ammunition.

451kr.


#3

451k,

Thanks for the information, but I purchased Mslect several days ago. The learning curve is a bit cumbersome, I’ll let you know how it works out.

Thanks,

Jones


#4

Here the data entry page from a MS Access database that I created to store information about my .22 boxes. I take it along to shows so I can look up boxes before I buy them. I got disgusted with buying a box only to get home to discover that I already had it in my collection.


#5

I also use Access for my collection, & I also used to buying many duplicates (I used to print it out then take the printout with me, still bought duplicates - now I use a netbook & search for what it is, much better so far, I think the netbook has already paid for itself).
Roger - how do you get the pictures into the program? I have tried it using the “insert object” but that makes the file very big and access only allows one to use 2 gigs. Are the pictures stored elsewhere on your harddrive? Someone once gave me some code that I could use to them import the picture into my forms but I could not work out where to put the code, what I know about computers is dangerous. Any help appreciated!


#6

[quote=“Will”]
Roger - how do you get the pictures into the program? I have tried it using the “insert object” but that makes the file very big and access only allows one to use 2 gigs. Are the pictures stored elsewhere on your harddrive? Someone once gave me some code that I could use to them import the picture into my forms but I could not work out where to put the code, what I know about computers is dangerous. Any help appreciated![/quote]

Will
Nothing special needed to create the form fields. You need to create an OLE Object for each view in your table design. Then you need to create a picture box for each view in your from and connect to the table fields that you just created. I just called mine; top, bottom, side1, side2, end1, end2. I originally just used the top and end but we all know that they have many different bottom. If the sides are the same I just use one side image and same for the ends. So Side2 and End2 are not normally used unless there is a difference.

After you have your table and form updated you need a way to acquire the images. I use PhotoShop but I think that PhotoShop Elements will do the same things that are required. with both Access and PS open (I use two monitors but not necessary) I scan the box sides into PS, trim, straighten and adjust whatever is needed, then (here’s the REAL SECRET), just grab the image in PS with the MOVE TOOL and drag it into the appropriate box on you form and let go of the mouse button. PRESTO! the picture is there in Access. There may be other image software that will let you scan into and do this. I have PhotoShop so that’s what I use.

Here was the tricky part, the Search Engine. It took me most of a year to get this to work. You can select any and all criteria from the top Search Criteria boxes, then click on the FIND symbol (the upside-down funnel) and it will search though your entire database and show the matching results. You then have the option to click the “FIND RECORD” button on the right and it will show your the Entry record that is the thread above. Really slick and saves mucho time when you looking up a box that you are thinking about purchasing but want to make sure that you don’t already have it. This has saved me hundreds of dollars and makes the whole shebang work at a show. I too use to print out a hard copy to take to shows but that in itself was expensive.

I looked at the netbooks but don’t think that they have the oomph to run this nor the desktop to display it without constant scanning back and for and up and down. I carry a lightweight 15" widescreen laptop. There is a little Toshiba laptop that weighs about 2 pounds that I hope Santa will consider dropping down my chimney. My HP starts out at 5 pounds at the beginning of a show but quickly triples in weight by the end of the show. Particularly if I’m lugging a couple dozen .22 boxes back home also:)


#7

Here’s a variance of my database for my newly started Metallic Cartridge collection.


#8

Roger, nice Access-app you created.
Perhaps it’s an idea to share it with other collectors by putting it up as a download on the IAA site? Even as a little encouragement for new members to join the IAA :)

I use a basic Excel worksheet to keep my pistol cartridge data sorted. Works well enough, although the main problem is storage (of the cartridges themselves). Since I also have access to the stuff that makes them go bang, I keep everything locked up in a safe.

Considering that I actually write software for a living, using Excel is a bit of an easy way out, but what every professional software developer will tell you is to go with the solution that is the easiest to develop and cheapest to maintain (or at least that’s what they ought to tell you…).


#9

[quote=“Vlim”]Roger, nice Access-app you created.
Perhaps it’s an idea to share it with other collectors by putting it up as a download on the IAA site? Even as a little encouragement for new members to join the IAA :)

I use a basic Excel worksheet to keep my pistol cartridge data sorted. Works well enough, although the main problem is storage (of the cartridges themselves). Since I also have access to the stuff that makes them go bang, I keep everything locked up in a safe.

Considering that I actually write software for a living, using Excel is a bit of an easy way out, but what every professional software developer will tell you is to go with the solution that is the easiest to develop and cheapest to maintain (or at least that’s what they ought to tell you…).[/quote]

Vlim
I often use Excel as a flat database. I seem to end up collecting a lot of different things and Excel works great for my smaller projects, especially if it is stuff that I need to sort quickly like names, dates, etc.

As for putting my Access database online for download it would only be usable by people that own and can use Access 2007 (or later) unless they download a runtime version from Microsoft. I’ve never tried the runtimes so I don’t know what the limitations are in using it. It could be converted to a stand-alone program but I don’t have that capability or software. I’m not sure what the size would be after I stripped out my data. It’s a little over a gig as it stands right now. There’s more to it than what I’ve shown, like reports. queries, etc. I would probably consider sharing it if someone wanted it as long as they realize that it is custom written to my needs.


#10

You can also find another access database on the main page of municion.org, very similar to your Roger.
Yes, it is in Spanish but can easily be translated.