Need Help with ID of this SL 42 Cartridge VERY UNUSUAL


#1

Hello, My name is Jim and this is my first posting to the forum, Thanks for the time in responses to this cartridge. What I know is SL is St. Louis of course U.S.Cartridge Co. and 42 is 1942, It is quite a bit narrower than a 45-70 and wider than a 30-06. I listed on E–y yesterday and bids started coming before it was booted off, I hopefully can find out what it is. Does not match any line throwers I can find. Would like to sell if its worth selling. but if only worth a few bucks I will just throw back in drawer. If you search “Insjim” on Ebay today before my auctions end you can see who and where it came from. Basically need to find out what the heck it is before I do anything. Anyone? Thanks




#2

My bet would be that you have an unfinished case, possibly out of a draw set. Others should be better able than me to speculate on what is was to be once finished.


#3

What you have is a Cal .30 (30-06) draw piece. From the St. Louis Ordnance Plant, 1942. It is one step in the manufacture of a cartridge case. It has gone through 9 or 10 draw steps, including the headstamp, and rough primer pocket. Later steps would finish the primer pocket, punch the flash hole, trim the rim to final size and shape, form the shoulder and neck, and trim to final length

Many collectors have a full set of draw pieces. Most of us have partial sets or one or two pieces taken at random from a series. The individual pieces, such as yours, are more of a novelty or curiosity than a real collectable although, you will probably find some collectors of U.S. military who would be interested in it.

I don’t like to do values since I’m usually wrong. Maybe someone else is willing to take a stab at it. I do know that you haven’t exactly hit the lottery.

Ray


#4

Cool, Is it worth anything?..cant find another for comparison. here is a couple more pics



#5

[quote=“RayMeketa”]What you have is a Cal .30 (30-06) draw piece. From the St. Louis Ordnance Plant, 1942. It is one step in the manufacture of a cartridge case. It has gone through 9 or 10 draw steps, including the headstamp, and rough primer pocket. Later steps would finish the primer pocket, punch the flash hole, trim the rim to final size and shape, form the shoulder and neck, and trim to final length

Many collectors have a full set of draw pieces. Most of us have partial sets or one or two pieces taken at random from a series. The individual pieces, such as yours, are more of a novelty or curiosity than a real collectable although, you will probably find some collectors of U.S. military who would be interested in it.

I don’t like to do values since I’m usually wrong. Maybe someone else is willing to take a stab at it. I do know that you haven’t exactly hit the lottery.

Ray[/quote]Great information, Thanks…Back in the drawer it goes.


#6

That EW 42 M1 Incendiary cartridge may be of more interest to Cal .30 collectors than the draw piece. EW did a lot of experimental work with different incendiary bullets in 1942. I’m not saying that yours is one of them, or that it’s worth big bucks, I’m just sayin’.

Ray