Need ID Help


#1

Hi folks,

Have a cartridge I have tried to ID using Steinhauer’s measurements but to no avail.
Bullet: RNL paper patched .422 just above the patch
OAL: 2.965
CL: 2.265
Base: .516
Rim: .64
HS: K at 12 o’clock, horizontal 8 at 3 & 9 o’clock
Keep in mind I am not a machinist. Thanks


#2

Sounds like a 10.75mm Russian Berdan to me. I suspect there might be a character at 6 o’clock which you’re missing and that would be the manufacturer’s mark. The ‘K’ would identify the metal provider and I’d say manufacture would be 1888.
A picture of the headstamp would be a great help…


#3

Jim,
There maybe 2 parallel vertical lines at 6 o’clock. Have looked under 15 power and cant really tell if one is a stamp mark and the other a scratch. Also didn’t mention it is a necked case. N: .445.

Rookie


#4

Okay…still sounds Russian. I suspect that the mark at 6 o’clock isn’t a manufacturer’s mark, it’ll be the quarter of the year of manufacture. i.e. two parallel lines indicate manufacture during the second quarter of the year. I’m pretty sure then that this round will have been manufactured by St.Petersburg.


#5

[quote=“Jim”]Sounds like a 10.75mm Russian Berdan to me. I suspect there might be a character at 6 o’clock which you’re missing and that would be the manufacturer’s mark. The ‘K’ would identify the metal provider and I’d say manufacture would be 1888.
A picture of the headstamp would be a great help…[/quote]

Jim, speaking of the 4.2-line Berdan cartridge the metric designation should be 10.67mm.
The 10.75 and some other designations are wide spread errors which survived in all sort of publications and articles.


#6

Yes, the 4,2 Linie Berdan Rifle Cartridge is actually “10,66 x57R” ( DM and ALFA Catalogues, pre WW I…) the “10,75” and other fanciful measurements are more likely Bullet diameter, not “Calibre”.

Doc AV


#7

Rookie,

I have found a picture on another site which I suspect is of your headstamp. If it is the same then you do have a Russian Berdan cartridge - although the calibre is more correctly 4.2 lines as EOD has pointed out.

Having thought about it I’d now suggest that the mark at 6 o’clock is the manufacturer St.Petersburg. I had previously thought that this might be a tri-mester mark but it is not.
The date of manufacture is 1888 and the ‘K’ at 12 o’clock is that of the brass supplier - but I don’t know who that is.


#8

[quote=“DocAV”]Yes, the 4,2 Linie Berdan Rifle Cartridge is actually “10,66 x57R” ( DM and ALFA Catalogues, pre WW I…) the “10,75” and other fanciful measurements are more likely Bullet diameter, not “Calibre”.

Doc AV[/quote]

Doc, I multiplied .42 (as Russian lines are bound to the inch) by 2.54 (inch conversion) and got 10.668 mm. As per mathematics the caliber is then rounded by 2 thousands of a mm to 10.67 mm.

As you mentioned already many people take cartridges with inch calibers (or other) and measure the projectile diameter and run with that - just ignoring that the projectile diameter is not the valid materic caliber designation of the round in question.


#9

Jim,

The picture you posted is the exact HS. Thanks for all the help, everyone.

Rookie