New Russian shotgun ammo - .366 TKM


This cartridge was officially introduced today as a new round for shotguns, intended for hunting, sport shooting,plinking and home defence
based on 7.62x39 case necked up for 9.55mm slugs and cut to 37.5mm

Obvious niche - use in surplus 7.62x39 rifles, factory converted (bored out or rebarreled) into shotguns and thus certified and registered. As of now, SKS are to be converted and sold on shotgun license. Apparently, a smooth-bore AKM rifles, restricted to semi-auto, are next to be offered. Standard bore configuration for weapons thus chambered is cylinder with Paradox rifling at the front of the bore (last 140mm)

The only reason for this is stupidity of Russian gun lwas: for get a rifle license (any rifle, even a single-shot .22) one must have minimum of 5 years of legal shotgun ownership under his belt.

That way many will be able to shoot military-looking and almost authentic weapons without a stupid 5-years wait.

Very interesting post.

It appears from your post that guns with part-rifled barrels classed as shotguns in Russia. Here in the UK, any amount of rifling in the barrel puts the gun into a more restrircted category.

Also, shotgun ammunition with a single projectile is classed as rifle ammunition in the UK.

Are semi-auto rifles with fully rifled barrels available to Russian civilians after five years?

The thing is that the barrels are normally smooth bore and only a detachable muzzle attachment is rifled then.
The Russians are doing this with their .410 Shotgun-AKs and special slugs are available.

So, Falcon, slugs/slug chokes/barrels are treated in special ways in the UK?

Yes, a shotgun with any rifling in the barrel is classified as a rifle under UK law, and is subject to more restrictions.

Shotgun cartridges loaded with slugs are also classified as rifle ammunition.

Rifled chokes are legally questionable. They are what we would call a “grey area”.

The guns that Max refers to in his post would be in the Section 5 (prohibited) category in the UK as they are rifled and semi-automatic.

PM me if you would like any more information.

I want to know how I can get my hands on one of these rounds. Better yet a whole box of them?

Zac

[quote=“Falcon”]Very interesting post.

It appears from your post that guns with part-rifled barrels classed as shotguns in Russia. Here in the UK, any amount of rifling in the barrel puts the gun into a more restrircted category.

Also, shotgun ammunition with a single projectile is classed as rifle ammunition in the UK.

Are semi-auto rifles with fully rifled barrels available to Russian civilians after five years?[/quote]

Per our gun laws, there are just two different types of long guns: shotguns (with smooth bore or with paradox rifling no longer than 14cm) and rifles. Law makes no difference between single shot, manual repeaters and semi-autos.
So, a grandpa’s single shot 28Ga piece requires same paperwork as semi-auto Saiga-12 or Benelli M4
Single-shot .22LR is no different (in regard to paperwork) from bolt-action .338LM sniper rifle or 7.62x54R DP-27 LMG, converted to semi-auto, or an Ar-15, or semi-auto AKM
Combination guns are registered as rifles.

There are certain limits applicable to both classes, i.e. maximum magazine capacity of 10 rounds (not applicable for guns used in sport shooting like IPSC) and minimum overall length in ready to fire condition (80cm)

Ammunition is classified by a type, as certified by manufacturer; i.e. any 12 Ga (slugs, saboted slugs, shot) are shotgun ammo, and sold to any owner of a registered 12 ga shotgun.
Same with rifle ammo; i.e. I own a Rossi 92 carbine registered as .38Sp/.357Mag; so I can buy both types of ammo on my carbine registration card, but no other rifle ammo.

Maxim,
I think that “9.55 mm” refers to the outside neck diameter…that would be .376", and the actual bullet diam is .366" so a standard 9.3 mm bullet.

Here some loads recently shown in the Russian gun journal “Kalashnikov” (11/2016).
No description given but most can be figured from the images.

1 Like

I have most of these dummies in my collection, except for the leftmost one, with shot
all are made on reused Soviet-era steel cases, with h/s “17 76”, “3 71” and “3 72”

I would be interested to know how they remove the shoulder and neck from surplus cases.

If only a Russian company such as Izhmash would make an AK type rifle on new receivers with fully smooth bored barrels chambered for this calibre.

As far as I know, they would be legal here in the UK with the shot loading shown on the left of EOD’s post. That would be the closest we could get to a real semi-auto AK. This is not counting straight-pull rifles chambered for 7.62x39 or Saigas chambered for conventional shotshells.

Actually, Kalashnikov concern has plans to start producing Saiga-366 next year, which is based on a semi-auto Saiga-7.62 receiver and has a smooth-bore barrel with Paradox rifling
http://world.guns.ru/shotgun/rus/saiga366-e.html

That gun would still be illegal here in the UK.

Here, to be defined as a shotgun, the barrel must be completely smooth. The barrel length must be over 610mm, and the overall length of the gun must be over 1020mm. The stocks must also be fixed.

For example a UK legal Saiga-12:

As an aside, if anyone has any inert dummies in .366 TKM calibre, I would be interested in obtaining an example.

Falcon, to grossly simplify the process, they shove progressively larger hardened dies down the neck with a giant press.

I am wondering if there have been any reports on the accuracy of the paradox rifling. If it works well it gives me an idea for a project for my .410.

The .410 exists in Russia already. Means a normal smooth bore gun (AK system) with a rifled muzzle attachment.

I have a set of 5 different dummies like shown on EOD photo, except for shot (different slugs)
I can spare one or two for a trade - PM me please if interested

With SKS rebarreled to .366 with about 120-140mm of paradox rifling at the muzzle people claim accuracy of about 10-15 cm (4-6") at 100 meters.
IIRC, some people reload their ammo using certain .375 commercial jacketed bullets, or cast their own lead bullets.

Thanks for the photos. That converted VSS Vintorez is intersting. Does Russian law allow civilians to own silencers, or has the silencer been disabled?

The Russian arms factories seem to make good use of surplus and obsolete weapons, whereas anywhere in the “western” world would simply destroy them.