"Official" designation of US 7.62x49 Experimental


#1

I want to get one of these cartridges for my collection, but I’m having a hard time with some of the search terms. I know it is commonly referred to as the “7.62x49”, but is there any better term or terms I can use?

What I’m looking for is this:

Plain (i.e., cheap) ball variant would work for me; I just want a cartridge example. I’m trying to build up a collection of the basic military .30 caliber ball types from around the world.


#2

Also, can anyone confirm or deny that Municion.org’s measure of 6.9mm (.272") for the case neck of this cartridge is correct?


#3

viewtopic.php?f=8&t=10513


#4

Thanks, bdgreen; that’s a pretty good resource.

Would that have been designated 7.62 or .30 Light Rifle at that point?


#5

[quoteWould that have been designated 7.62 or .30 Light Rifle at that point?][/quote]

Light Rifle - 7.62 was not formally used until NATO adopted a cartridge using a 51mm case length as the NATO standard in 1954. The official title being Cartridge, Cal. 7.62mm, NATO, [type].

NATO Dave


#6

Thanks, Dave!


#7

Tau

There are several versions of the 1.95" (49mm) Cal .30 Light Rifle case/cartridge. Some of them are very hard to find while others are relatively common. I have a few dupes and I’d be happy to give you one but the shipping could prove to be a deal-killer. Even one live cartridge has to go UPS Ground at their minimum charge.

As NATO Dave said, the metric designation was not used on any of the Light Rifle (LR) cartridges. The metric system was not well received in the U.S. until late in the 20th Century. Even the commercial manufacturers shied away from it because they felt it would affect sales.

BTW, the official neck length as shown on the Frankford Arsenal drawing is .303". Manufacturing tolerances may account for the figure shown by Municion.org. Or, they could be, simply, wrong.

Ray


#8

Ray, I’ve sent you a PM. That’s a very kind offer.