Old .22 Bullet mould


#1

I was given this old bullet mould today at work. Looking at the internal shape of the moulding cavity, I believe it may actually be for airgun pellets. Above the pivot pin on the handle on top of the other in the photo it says “LEM MOULDS ENGLAND” in a shield. In the same place on the other handle it says “CALIBRE .22”. When the mould is turned over, on the top handle it says “REGD.DESIGN 29203” in a circle, imagine this like a headstamp, with “REGD…” in the top half, and the number in the bottom. On the edge of the actual brass mould towards the bottom of the photo, faced away fron the handles it says “cE .22” and on the opposite mould, in the same place it says “cE .22”.

How old is this? And is is for moulding .22 bullets for live ammunition or airgun pellets?

If anyone is interested in this item, I would be willing to trade it for something.[/img]


#2

Falcon

I used to have one. I bought it when I was about 18 and I am 54 now so you can work out the age for yourself.
It was intended to cast a heavyweight air rifle pellet for hunting purposes. Mine produced a pointed pellet with a hollow base. I think they also produced a .22 ball mould and a .177 mould

The pellets were too heavy to stabilise in my air rifle and tumbled so I only ever cast the one batch.

LEM are still producing moulds. They are based in Blackpool if I remember correctly. They are well known in the muzzle loader world for their round ball moulds. I think thats all they produce.

You can find them in the Henry Krank catalogue item 1271 although they are not named but described as custom brass moulds.


#3

Thanks for the info Vince. How do you use it? Dip it in a pot of molten lead?


#4

No, you pour the lead in from a ladle or a bottom pour lead pot same as a conventional bullet mould. Only difference is that the spout is on the side with that mould so you have to tilt it over at about 45 degrees.

If you just want to make an impression to see what it looks like put a piece of blue tack about the right size in the mould and squeeze hard.


#5

Thinking about it, we have a tin of airgun pellets in the shed with “LEM .177” handwritten on top, and the pellets look exactly the same as the inside of this mould. Someone must have cast a batch in one of these moulds that somehow ended up in our hands.


#6

They might work better in .177 than they did for me in the .22 because of the power to weight ratio.
I understand the moulds still have some interest in the airgun world among the “overpowered” brigade.