Old 303 dug up, kindly help with Manu and date info

I found this in the garden when I was about 10 and with all this self-isolation, it popped up again in the garage. I suspect it was made in Birmingham but when? Can any expert confirm?

Here is the body Pic

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Welcome aboard.

You are correct. This is a Birmingham Metals and Munitions Company Mark VI ball round manufactured in 1911. The two broad arrow ( /|\ ) marks are Government acceptance marks, added post production.

Edit: broad arrow didn’t show correctly.

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Awesome Thanks so much for the reply!
Someone around that time must have been out hunting in the Kwa Zulu Natal Bush unless it was the BSAP or linked to just after the Boer war.
I found this when I was about 10 – 45 years ago when we were digging a compost heap in our back yard in Durban.
It has been lying in a drawer in my garage since my folks sold the place 18 years ago. Shone it up and decided to use the internet to see the history.
Once again – thanks for the reply.

This round was produced almost a decade after the Boer war, so not related. You will likely never know its 109 year history and that is all part of the enjoyment of this hobby.

I believe this is a Mk VI (6) as per the headstamp. Mk IV had a hollow point

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You are correct and thank you for picking up my obvious typo. I am beginning to see whey they stopped using Roman numerals. I’ve edited my original reply to correct this.

Nero would feed you to the lions.

Nice round. 1911 is quite late for a MkVI, as it was replaced by the MkVII (which was pointy rather than rounded) in 1910. Certainly the latest MkVI I’ve seen, unless someone has slightly later.

Best regards,

Simon

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Just for you to see the difference between a MkVI and a MkVII, these are my two rounds. Left a 1908 MkVI, middle a 1914 MkVII and right, I included a blank, which has a MkVII headstamp dating to 1910, the first year of the MkVII.

Best regards,

Simon

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Australia loaded MkV1 till January 1918.
My latest MkV1 is headstamped G 26 V1.

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From my understanding, India was the last country to field rifles sighted for the round nose Mk 6.

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My latest Mark VI round is dated 1917. Here is an summary of what I have in my collection (sorted by year). I am assuming that the undated Canadian round is an early production.


(note: “Cordite” was dropped from the official nomenclature in 1907).

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I only have three Greenwood & Batley .303 rounds using the “G” headstamp code. All three are Mark VII ball and are dated 15, 16 and 26.

Clearly they were producing both marks at the same time, presumably, as indicated by Falcon, for use in rifles still sighted for the Mark VI.

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I have 21 .303 rounds with G headstamps. GB 29 V11 is my first GB headstamp.
I am sure I am missing many dates. Some have arrows and dot variations.

Dates are:
G 08 ^V1 ^, ^ G 09 ^ V1, G 11 ^ V1 ^, G 11 ^ V11 ^, G 12 ^ V1 ^, G 12 ^ V11 ^, G 13 ^ V1,
G 13 V11, G 14 V11 (Mk V1 & V11 loadings), G 15 V11, G 15 V11 ( Mk111 Drill),
G 16 V11, G.16 V11, G 17 V11Z, G 18 V11Z, G 1918 V11Z, G 23 V11, G 24 V11, G 26 V1,
G.26…V11 , G 27. .V11, G 27 V1 (Drill MkV1), G.28…V11. , G 29…V11. ,
GB.29 V11 (Loaded as Mk V1 and V11) my first GB headstamps.

My latest Mk V1 round is actually GB .29…V11.
I am missing so many dates but shows how V1 & V11 were loaded at the same time.

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