Old Collectors Cartridge List


#1

While digging in a box of stuff I have not looked through in 30 years, I found a copy of “Specimen Cartridge List No. 3” from Fred J. Braucher, in Canfield Ohio. The list is from 1946. (click on the images to be able to read them). The complete list is 16 pages. What I would not give to have these prices back. Check out the .35 Allen & Wheellock Rimfire for $1.00 or the Raised H .44 Henry for 15 cents or the .52-70 Sharps Rimfire for $2.50. On the second page we find such things as the .40-90-370 Sharps Bottlenecked Paper Patched for 40 cents and the .44-95 Whatcheer for the enormous price of $1.25. On the last page we find the really expensive things: .42 Cup Primed–50 cents; .44 Lip-Fire–60 cents; and who would be crazy enough to pay 50 cents for a .50 Smith or .50 Gallager Carbine. And $1.00 for a .69 Musketoon Combustible. Why that would have been Highway robbery!!! Just thought I would share this bit of nostalgia of days gone by.


#2

Nice list!! I’ll take a .303 Rimless for Lewis MG for 40 Cents and a 1" Gatling AP for $2.


#3

Use this to see how good a deal those old prices were.

westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi

Ray


#4

Ray–Good link. So that $1.25 .40-95 Whatcheer would have cost $13.53 in todays money. I bet you can’t find one for that price!!


#5

Thanks Ron! Fun stuff… Reminded me of a catalog I have. It is a 1962 “Guns” Martin B. Retting West Hurly N.Y. catalog that has a number of cartridges in it. Here are a few scans, click on the image for the full size…



The 42 Cupfire did not appreciate in value much between 1946 and 1962, it is still only 50 cents. How about 75 cents for an original 7rd pack of Navy & Infantry 56-56 Spencer or $2.00 for 25rds. Or 50 cents for a 56 Billinghurst volley gun cartridge. My favorite has to be the 45 Mars Short for $4.50.

Most of the catalog is guns. For those that are interested, here are some of the prices:

$12.50 for a Spencer Carbine
$12.50 for a VG condition U.S. M-1821 Musket
$45 For a complete Arisaka sniper rifle or $30 for a Arisaka Type II Paratrooper rifle
$45 for a Walther G-41 or $47.50 for a G-43
$50 for a 1903 Springfield

And why spend $40 on the commercial Colt 1911 when you can get the military surplus 1911 for $27.50

Where is H.G. Wells when you need him??? ;-)


#6

One of the first Cartridge Dealers I ever placed an order with was from that exact Martin B. Retting catalog. Boy does it ever bring back memories.


#7

I have Pixley and Murphy Catalogs from 1936 and 1938…prices are great!!..although…a .276 Pedersen was 3 bucks, cause it was rare?? then…and it’s still a $3.00 or less cartridge today…I have a few of these catalogs if anyone is interested…Randy


#8

No such thing as a one inch Gatling AP. What he had was the one inch Nordenfeldt.


#9

No such thing as a one inch Gatling AP. What he had was the one inch Nordenfeldt.[/quote]

I thought they probably meant the Nordenfelt, but 1" Gatling AP is what it says.

Can anyone answer, what is so special about the 1 1/2" Parachute flare by Lake Erie Chemical Co. to make it worth $6 in 1946 ($64.96 in Today’s money)?


#10

No such thing as a one inch Gatling AP. What he had was the one inch Nordenfeldt.[/quote]

I thought they probably meant the Nordenfelt, but 1" Gatling AP is what it says.

Can anyone answer, what is so special about the 1 1/2" Parachute flare by Lake Erie Chemical Co. to make it worth $6 in 1946 ($64.96 in Today’s money)?[/quote]

That kind of round was very rare in that time period. They are not common now-just few serious collectors of such stuff.

That is what it says all right. Here is my standing offer of $5,000 for the first One inch Gatling AP shell which you turn up. Hurry- I’m old.This does not include the modern “VULCAN” reincarnation of the Gatling gun.


#11

No such thing as a one inch Gatling AP. What he had was the one inch Nordenfeldt.[/quote]

I thought they probably meant the Nordenfelt, but 1" Gatling AP is what it says.

Can anyone answer, what is so special about the 1 1/2" Parachute flare by Lake Erie Chemical Co. to make it worth $6 in 1946 ($64.96 in Today’s money)?[/quote]

That kind of round was very rare in that time period. They are not common now-just few serious collectors of such stuff.

That is what it says all right. Here is my standing offer of $5,000 for the first One inch Gatling AP shell which you turn up. Hurry- I’m old.This does not include the modern “VULCAN” reincarnation of the Gatling gun.[/quote]

I thought the flare round would have been common after WW2, with surplus stocks, vet bring backs etc.

"$5000 for a Gatling AP shell if I can find one."
Proceeds to fit Nordenfelt bullet in Gatling case and post it to Maryland.


#12

The single most important factor that no “inflation calculation” can account for is demand. I recently paid out a bunch of my fixed income dollars for a pre-NATO 30 Light Rifle cartridge that would probably have gone for two-bits in 1946, assuming anyone was interested.

Another consideration relates to disposable income. A buck in 1946 was worth as much as $15 today, but few people in 1946 had that extra buck to spend whereas today most anyone has the $15.

But nostalgia is still a wonderful pastime. My old catalogs are an important part of my hobbies.

Ray


#13

I would buy back most items from my sales lists from the 70s for 5-10 times the sale prices. GLADLY !

WITH THOSE DEEP STAB CRIMPS IT IS REAL HARD TO GET THE AP SLUG OUT OF A NORDENFELDT AND IT STILL WOULD NOT BE AN AP GATLING. GOOD LUCK.


#14

I wasn’t being serious…I don’t even have any Nordenfelt rounds.


#15

I wasn’t being serious…I don’t even have any Nordenfelt rounds.[/quote]

I suspected.