Old Russian Hunting Cartridges


#1

Does anyone have any additional information or maybe Russian contacts who could fill us in on these old Russian hunting sporting cartridges?

Cartridges for .320 , .380 and .440 diameter bullets, based on a shortened Berdan cartridge. From Tula in the early 1900s?
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2925&hilit=320+berdan

7.62x48R based on shortened 7.62x54R cartridge 139grain (9g) @ (725mps) 2378fps Circa 1916 - 1918 by V. E. Markovich. Used in converted Mosin Nagant actioned rifles.

8.2x66 Russian KO, circa 1931. Originally with a lead bullet. Original velocity of 400 mps (1312 fps). A “low pressure” cartridge with same rim size as 7.62 Russian so that it will function in Mosin-Nagant rifle action but with a larger base diameter. Originally developed as a sniper round?? (can anyone confirm that?) 8.2x66M with a circa post WWII? Modernized version of the 8,2x66 with a 9.5 gm jacketed bullet at approximately 653 mps

A 9mm or .35 caliber black powder cartridge with a paper patched lead bullet from Izhevsk circa 1905, used in Berdana?

Smokeless powder 10.66x57R Berdan cartridges circa 1926?


8.2x66 Russian
#2

I can only provide short info reagarding 8,2x66 cartridges

8,2x66SR cartridge was developed in early 1930s by Dmitry Kochetow. this was hunting cartridge with lead bullet. It was soon abandoned because of low muzzle velocity and poor penetration of the bullet.

In early 1960s this cartridge was modernized by Mikhail Blum and received a designation as 8,2x66M. In this cartridge was used new powder load and soft point bullet 9,6 grams. As a result the muzzle velocity increased to 635 m/s.

Both cartridges was only hunting, not sniper


#3

Here are my notes on the 8.2x66R (or SR) :


Russia produced two sporting calibres based on a unique semi-rimmed (non military) case design with a 13.15mm base, 12.35mm groove and 14.3mm rim. This case appears originally to have been derived from a combination of the 7.62x54R Mosin-Nagant case (SV14) and the 10.66x57R Russian Berdan. It uses the same rim dimension as the 7.62x54R and the base of the 7.62x54R is the same as the groove on the 8.2x66R. However, the base on these “KO” types has been enlarged to 13.15mm which is the same as the 10.66x57R Russian Berdan cartridge. This would allow Mosin-Nagant Rifles to be re-chambered for this larger diameter case and obviously allow a greater powder charge for a given case length producing higher performance.

The 8.2x66R is the earlier and commoner of the two KO calibres (see also the 9x64 SV10) and was intended for use in the bolt action KO-8.2 Hunting Carbine (which was a converted military rifle). Note : K = Karabin (Carbine) and O = Ochotnicij (‘Hunting’). No hs are known on this cartridge cases. Plain lead, SN and FMJ bullets are all known loaded in this case but not all may be original.

There is mixed information about when this was introduced and also whether it is still used:

  • Badalik believed that this was introduced in 1953, others 1950’s but some evidence states that it may have been as early as 1946.

  • There is also conjecture thay this may have been the calibre for the HK-8.2 Rifle developed in the 1930’s by D.M. Kocetov. According to DocAv : “The initial 1930s development was for a Sniping rifle, and the action is a modified Mosin Action; by 1948, the Sniping part was dropped, and it became a “Government Issue Hunter’s Rifle” for use in outer Siberia for large game (Bear and Elk and Sheep) hunting.” However DocAv has also previously stated : “They were initially developed in the late 1930s as a dedicated hunting cartridge for Government-licensed meat and skin hunters in Siberia.”

According to a Russian website (translated) : Hunting carbine NK -8,2 under the cartridge of 8,2kh’’ mm : NK -8,2 - hunting carbine of the caliber of 8,2 mm the construction of D.M.Kochetova on the base of
mm rifle S.L.Mosina under the cartridge of 8,2kh’’ mm with the special case, which has cap without the flange and housing of the increased capacity. Was made in series at the Tula arms factory in 1931-1941 the planned long-range cartridge of large power so not it was released. Were sold only cartridges with the uncoated lead bullet." [ED : This could be another case type <> 8.2x53R SV3 ??.]

In 1962 a more powerful version was introduced known as the “8.2x66M” (where ‘M’ stands for ‘modernised’). Production of weapons using this cartridge ceased in 1976 as the 308 Winchester was introduced into the USSR for hunting.

Here are my notes on the 9x64R (or SR):

Russia produced two sporting calibres based on a unique semi-rimmed (non military) case design with a 13.15mm base, 12.35mm groove and 14.3mm rim. This case appears originally to have been derived from the 7.62x54R Mosin-Nagant case (SV14) using the same rim dimension and the base of the 7.62x54R is the same as the groove on the KO. The base on the KO types has however been enlarged to 13.15mm. This would allow Mosin-Nagant Rifles to be re-chambered for this larger diameter case and obviously allow a greater powder charge for a given case length producing higher performance. No hs are known on this cartridge cases and the manufacturer and years of introduction are not known for certain but believed to have commenced in the 1946/47 period.

Note : K = Karabin (Carbine) and O = Ochotnicij (‘Hunting’)

The 9x64R is is the most powerful of the Russian sporting calibres and is believed to have been developed by the Russian gun designer M.N. Bljum. It was developed later (c1955-57) but using the same case type as the 8.2x66R (SV10). Used in the bolt action K0-9 and “B-9” Hunting Carbines. Only loaded with SN bullets and this calibre is practically unknown outside of Russia.


#4

WBD, the 9x64 Blyum has no rim to what I know and have. The case is merely identical to a 9.3x64 Brennecke respectively the SVDK they are using today in the sniper role. Just the charge of the Blyum was different. Can not state on the projectiles since I have an empty case only.


#5

EOD, the 9x64 I refer to is not the 9.3x64 Brenneke (which is referred to as 9.3x64 on recent LVE/Barnaul packets). As I stated the 9x64R (or probably more correctly SR = semi-rimmed) has “a 13.15mm base, 12.35mm groove and 14.3mm rim” the Brenneke has a rimless case with a c12.85mm base. I believe that an example of the 9x64 maybe shown as the top cartridge in the first photo in this thread.


#6

WBD, you are right. I went by the case geometry and have overseen the semi rim.


#7

Here it is:


#8

Any new information on old Russian hunting cartridges mentioned above, or like the 10.5x70mm Russian hunting cartridge which was made from necking down the 32 gauge brass shotgun shell or the 9x64SR Blyum pictured above?


#9

ammo-collection.com/index.php?ti … 0%B8%D0%B9
8,2 -mm hunting