Online book publishing


#1

For 4 years now I have been doing short-run book publishing for my 3 cartridge books, and I have a few others in the pipeline. Up until now I have been using Staples when decent coupons were available for their copy & print center, as those prices were the best option as compared to other local printers, and the online on-demand printers required too much quantity, or had too many format or quality requirements to make it easy.

I have however, just discovered what looks like a decent place online out of Rochester, NY called book1one ( http://www.book1one.com ) and they specialize in short-run printing with different basic options for book formats. The thing that caught my attention is their instant quote system, and that the prices were easily half of whatever Staples best prices had ever been. It also allows you to change quantity for different quantity discounts. This should allow me to do cartridge books at lower prices for buyers while making more money for myself. If anybody wants to do a short booklet in spiral-bind or whatever, this may be worth checking.

There was a report at this link reporting that this company is doing really well apparently:
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/local-book-manufacturer-book1one-track-172400040.html

What else does anybody use for publishing like this?


#2

Matt I use a local printer for the auction catalogs, but I just print a certain amount. Not 10 or whatever at a time.


#3

Matt, Thanks for posting this info. as this may be just the thing I need for my Hubel wildcat booklet.

Zac


#4

Hi Matt,

I use www.createspace.com and publish on Amazon:

amazon.com/gp/product/147934 … d_i=507846

I have had great luck with both. -Ger


#5

Printing on Demand services are getting better and better everywhere.

I had nice soft cover bound books (75 pages) printed at a European PoD service and they came out very nicely.


#6

I side with Vlim that printed books are much more practical for the user. Especially reference works where you tend so jump between pages in different locations within the book.

Having made a living in electronic data processing for well over thirty years now, my view is that it will be just a matter of time until a given ebook format will become unreadable. Unless you are willing to spend the next decades struggling to convert from one format to the next, each time spending money on this process.

Each time I open a book or journal a century old, I am really glad they did not have any electronic gimmicks.


#7

[quote=“JPeelen”]I side with Vlim that printed books are much more practical for the user. Especially reference works where you tend so jump between pages in different locations within the book.

Having made a living in electronic data processing for well over thirty years now, my view is that it will be just a matter of time until a given ebook format will become unreadable. Unless you are willing to spend the next decades struggling to convert from one format to the next, each time spending money on this process.

Each time I open a book or journal a century old, I am really glad they did not have any electronic gimmicks.[/quote]

well, my time in IT is a bit shorter at only 20 years, but in most cases I prefer e-books for reference. Even my humble library of 250 gun-related paper books tate a lot of shelf space and quite some time to find a necessary fact, figure or image
On the other hand, my e-library has about twice that much books plus close to the tousand manuals; many of those are seachable in full text, and all are neatly stored on one 2.5" external HDD (plus some backup copies, of cause)
My current non-gun library also 99.9% electronic these days, I only buy paper books when I have the chance to have them autographed to me by author.

Having said that, my own upcoming books will be printed on quality paper by a proper publishing house ;)


#8

Max,
I should have made more clear what I mean by e-book.
The most important feature of an e-book is digital rights management (DRM). It gives the “buyer” the technical means to read the book and at the same time prevents unauthorized copies and printing (by logical glueing to the hardware).
This is important for the seller (and the author) to obtain any income from publishing an e-book.
The dark side of DRM is, each is a closed system. What happens if the publisher goes out of business? What happens if the hardware breaks? What happens if you want to pass on your copy to someone else? As I was told: if you delete your Amazon account, you loose access to all your Kindle e-books. It actually happened that a publisher deleted an e-book from the systems of all “buyers” (copyright problems, if I remember correctly).

What you describe as your e-library are, I suppose, files in widespread formats like PDF, JPG etc. Core feature: no digital rights management! Most probably, these will be readable on future systems for a long time. Because of the sheer number of such files in existence, it will be very difficult to introduce a new system that cannot handle them. Many, including me, have such libraries and use them intensely. But I use it only as an archive. Reports and books I refer to often I always have in paper from.


#9

Yes, no DRM for me. PDF, DJVU and plain scans in JPG all the way
And I just hate to imagine how much space and money would otherwise take my digital collection of several hundreds of manuals, some of them quite rare and with many pages.