Original Russian matryoshka from Vladislav Dvoryaninov

Here are few photo of one “traditional” Russian souvenir – “Matryoshka” also called as “Nested Doll”, “Russian dolls”, “Babushka” and so on…
But very original, as you can see. This is “Nested ammo-doll”. Big image is here
That was invented and designed by Vladislav N. Dvoryaninov in 1994, despite the fact that he was the chief of leading Russian and Soviet division of the military small arms ammunition.

As can be seen from pictures, matryoshka consist of 5 cartridges – large caliber 14.5x114 and 12.7x108; Mosin’s 7.62x54R; Kalashnikov’s 5.45x39 and PSM’s 5.45x18-mm.
Because the author was directly involved in their creation he very well knew them dimensions. What succeeded elegantly used for such an unusual composition.
As they say - talented people - talented in everything…



Big images are here and here

Vladislav Dvoryaninov also wrote a monumental work - The monograph “Small arms ammo” consist of four book’s where interesting, professionally and in detail describes the history of ammunition from their inception to the present day.
Many described history and constructions (especially about Russian ammo) are unique and published for the first time.


link

What…no Tokarev!

Yeah, that 12.7 steel case in duplex configuration is pure cynicism… Where are my heart pills???

Dear EOD, There is no fake. Pictures are real.
Take it easy please, because your heart is much more important then steel case :-)))
Detailed article about their history is coming up soon.

Regards!

COOL STUFF!

Dear EOD, There is no fake. Pictures are real.
Take it easy please, because your heart is much more important then steel case :-)))
Detailed article about their history is coming up soon.

Regards![/quote]

Privet Nikolay,
I did not intend to say or even think it is a fake. Certainly this one is legit and as far as I have seen it is most likely experimental (at least on the steel case part). It just broke me a bit as we see those being made into very average souvenirs while most researchers never have even held one of these in their hands, let alone that they would ever own one.
Will that article contain other info than Dvoryaninov’s book?

Nikolay,

Very interesting!

Thanks for posting.

Brian

Dear EOD,

You’re right about experimentality of duplex.
I’m not sure and can’t to comment the possibilities and “in depth” of researchers :-))
But ordinary steel 12,7x108 cartridges can be made between 1979 and 1982 like regular production.
Because at end of 1978 the construction documentation for steel cases was officially approved by GRAU.
The coming article is based on monograph (in part of ammo).
Of course, that’s not possible to get more proffesional and detailed information than in book-4.
But Article focused on steel case problem and include new (2105) comment from Vladislav Dvoryaninov how the steel case “working” during the shot and why don’t work reliably on YakB-12,7.
The original (russian) article also include the common remarks about GUN’s, effectivity and so on. Will see!

Regards!

Nikolay, that sounds good. It will be interesing to read that article then.

Do you happen to have seen any of the headstamps of the 12.7mm steel cases made between 1979 and 1982?
The latest steel case in the USSR I have seen was from 1974. Was this one not related to the 1979-1982 story?

Do you happen to know about the background of the steel cases they made in the 1950s which today only turn up as regular dummies (very few) which have fluted cases and are Nickel or Chrome plated?
So far I had the impression that these were made for tests too but ened up as dummies after something did not work out.
Back then there was no YakB-12.7 so can we assume there was another reason to abandon the steel case issue?

[quote=“EOD”]Nikolay, that sounds good. It will be interesing to read that article then.

Do you happen to have seen any of the headstamps of the 12.7mm steel cases made between 1979 and 1982?
The latest steel case in the USSR I have seen was from 1974. Was this one not related to the 1979-1982 story?

Do you happen to know about the background of the steel cases they made in the 1950s which today only turn up as regular dummies (very few) which have fluted cases and are Nickel or Chrome plated?
So far I had the impression that these were made for tests too but ened up as dummies after something did not work out.
Back then there was no YakB-12.7 so can we assume there was another reason to abandon the steel case issue?[/quote]
Privet!
My short reply – I have not seen.
Because I’m not an expert in the headstamps. I’m sure that your experience are much better then my.
When I’m talking about the period 79-82, this means that the 12,7 steel cases should be called as a “regular and approved” only during that period were produced. I do not know how many of them were produced exactly between 79 and 82.
But I believe that these parties were. At the same time, we know that research and the experiments were conducted continuously. And much more active with steel since 1966.
Therefore exemplars of which you mention are from some pre-regular or experimental parties. This is normal.
As for the your second question:
I do not know any reason to plate cases by chrome or nickel, except for souvenirs. Because chrome is hard and brittle. And, nickel is completely the opposite.
Both of them are not suitable for cases plating (they can’t “to help them” by something). In addition, both are strategic and very expensive for regular production.
IMHO these “new regular dummies”, originally – are souvenirs only.
Some time ago was popular the “stand pencils” and other souvenirs including “full realistic dummies” made from large-caliber ammo.
I’ve seen a lot of them in the VIP offices and just on the tables of engineers. Often they had a brilliant chrome plate as finish. This is normal too.
Regards!

Nikolay, thanks for the insight!
Besides desktop ornaments and souvenirs (I also remember key chains) the Nickel or Chrome (less shiny types if it really is Chrome) are observed on Russian “tekhnologitseskie” cartridges used in weapon development (basically dummies). These are known to have traces of heavy use and scratches and dents. Several such types are documented in various calibers.
The 12.7 plated steel case dummies I described above also do show respective wear from linking and feeding operations.

After all we know then Russian steel cases from 1941, the 1950s, 1974 and then as you say 1979-82.

topwar.ru/86396-dvoynoy-udar.html

Spasibo Ruslan!