Patent ignition blues


#1

Unidentified patent ignition cartridges. 50-69 and 50 pistol case with smaller ball.


#2

Do the case crimps go all the way around, or are these Benet-primed cases that someone has modified.

If the one on the right is a 50 caliber pistol case, then I am at a loss as to what the lines on your reference grid represent? They don’t appear to be 1/8" or 5mm.


#3

why the assumption that these evaded a patent?


#4

[quote=“GuyHildebrand”]Do the case crimps go all the way around, or are these Benet-primed cases that someone has modified.

If the one on the right is a 50 caliber pistol case, then I am at a loss as to what the lines on your reference grid represent? They don’t appear to be 1/8" or 5mm.[/quote]

Grid means nothing. It is math paper.

The 50 pistol case is necked down.


#5

I don’t understand this question. I know nothing about these two items except that they came from the Yonetz collection and are both Benet primer center fire cases.

The loads look good to me and appear very old.


#6

The pistol cartridge looks a lot like the .45 Royal Remington cartridge, but the known examples are Farrington primed. Perhaps this one was made by Remington in the process of developing the cartridges that were eventually cased with the two sets of pistols that are known to exist. Brandt (Manual of Pistol and revolver Cartridges) mentions that the pistols were shown at the 1873 Vienna International Exposition. Since the Benet-primed .50 Remington pistol cartridges were in production in the early 1870s, the timing would sure be right. However, as Remington was an ammunition maker, I can’t imagine why they would use a Benet case, but it also make little sense that they would use Farrington primed cases made by the US Cartridge Company, as those that were found with the cased sets of pistols were.

The following is from Buttweiler’s Collector’s Ammunition Vol IV, #3:


#7

Thanks. Could be that.


#8

These don’t fit in my collection . They will be on Auctionarms or Gunbroker when I get to them.