Peters Belted Bullet


#1

This one was listed as Peters Item No. 3090: “.30 Springfield, 1903, RUSTLESS, Belted Non-Disintegrating, Expanding, 225 grs.”


The bullet type was introduced in 1934 per Chris Punnett’s book “.30-06” and did not see manufacture post WWII. The .30-1903 was last listed in 1937 from what I can find in the wonderful selection of catalogs found via the IAA home page. There is a section drawing shown of this projectile in the “.30-06” book on page 281. I was looking for a pic of an actual bullet of this type sectioned but have yet to find one. Any such photos out there?

Thanks,
Dave


#2


#3

Ray,

Thank you very much for posting that photo. Interesting design!

Dave


#4

GUS PERET DESIGNED, BUT DID NOT PATENT, THIS STYLE OF BULLET. GUS WAS EMPLOYED BY PETERS AS AN EXHIBITION SHOOTER. HE WAS ALSO A FAIRLY WELL KNOWN BIG GAME HUNTER AND PHOTOGRAPHER. HE SHOT MANY CARTOON SYLE PORTRAITS USING SHEET TIN AS HIS CANVASS WITH A MODEL 24 REMINGTON RIFLE AS HIS BRUSH. THIS BULLET DESIGN WAS OFFERED BY PETERS IN THE FOLLOWING CALIBERS; .30-30 WINCHESTER, .30 REMINGTON, .30-40 KRAG, .30 SPRINGFIELD MODEL 1903, .30 SPRINGFIELD MODEL 1906, .300 H&H MAGNUM, .32 WINCHESTER SPECIAL, .348 WINCHESTER, AND .35 REMINGTON. IF I HAVE LEFT OUT ANY CALIBERS, SOMEONE PLEASE FEEL FREE TO ADD THEM TO THE LIST.


#5

The first half of the 20th Century was the golden age of hunting bullet innovation, design, and patenting. Most were multiple-piece and many were complicated, difficult to manufacture, and expensive. If the real-life results would have been anywhere near the advertising claims, they would have lasted a lot longer than they did. But, their performance usually fell short and few of them survived into the second half of the century. That, plus the slowdown in the manufacture of new small arms ammunition during the Second World War, and the “discovery” that bullets of a more conventional design worked as well or better, signaled the end of that era. But, they did create a collecting specialty on their own, and that’s why we are here.

Just a few more.

Ray


#6

GWB,

.300 & .303 Savage as well as the .32 Remington were also listed as available with the belted bullet in 200, 180 and 180 grain weights respectively…

Dave


#7

Some boxes in .30-40 Krag caliber…
The 180 grain bullet is commonly found with a tinned belt…the 225 grain bullet, in this caliber has only been seen with a GM (non-tinned) belt, however, as can be seen here, boxes were made which show a tinned belt…

Randy


#8

Missing the lid, a factory sample set.

The close-up sectioned piece does not have a tinned ‘belt’. Sorry but the close up is cropped from the other which I sized & set the dpi before I cropped it. Still you can see the inner piece. Somewhat different than Ray’s quality sectioned example in that the outer jacket incloses the inner ‘belt’.

Headstamp is; PETERS 30G1906


nice boxes Randy.


#9

Randy,

As always, great boxes!

Pete,

Nice sample box. Very interesting the different construction seen between your example and Ray’s section work. It sure looks like Ray’s item has a “belt” with a consistent wall thickness and the thickness of yours seems to vary with its interior following the outer contour of the main jacket. I note that Ray removed the core on his example though I can’t think how that would matter regarding the “belt” unless heat was used and something with a low melt point once resided there…

As Ray noted, these specialty hunting bullets were expensive and most didn’t make it to the post WWII lineup. I would have to believe this Peters offering was one of the more costly to produce. The 1936 Peters price list shows the 225 gr. version in .30-06 costing about 11% more than the conventional 220 gr. soft point loading. Probably was a tough time economy wise to sell much of a premium product line though the advertisements do have their charm!

Dave


#10

I’m having a bad case of deja vu. Didn’t we discuss these bullets once before and determine that they were actually two different designs? The sectioned one was not the same as the unsectioned ones??? The sectioned one being a relative of the CoreLokt.???

Getting old really sucks! I’d advise all of you to stop it while you can. ;-) ;-0

Ray


#11

Ray,

Perhaps this is the source of your deja vu?

[Peters .30-06 Belted Bullet (Sectioned))

I think the boxed examples shown in this old thread are different from the ones Pete posted here. The sectioned projectile here seems to show a distinct seam between the “belt” and the main jacket. The example posted by Guy back in '08 does appear to have a homogeneous jacket formed in the style of a “CoreLokt” or maybe “Inner Belted” design. If I follow Pete’s description of the sectioned projectile right, he’s saying it does have the externally visible belt, just that it is not tinned.

If I had to guess why the difference between your sectioned bullet and Pete’s, it would be that yours is an earlier type and they later mellowed out the extreme features of the main jacket and just swaged a belt on it. Again, just a guess!

Dave

P.S. If your old photo post was still active I wouldn’t have had to bug folks (you) for another showing! Anyway, a neat design worth discussing again…Thanks.


#12

Thanks for finding that Dave. I guess my memory isn’t as bad as I thought it was. :-)

I lost many of my photos when my PC crashed a few years ago. That’s the cause of the missing link.

Ray


#13

DaveE
The sectioned piece in my set is not tinned, and the inner ‘belt’ is fully enclosed within the outer GM jacket. Where on Ray’s example the inner ‘belt’ extends above the outer jacket to form the bullet tip / nose.
A better photo, to clear thing up a bit.


#14

Pete,

Thanks for showing the clearer photo. That is indeed a different design from what I thought I was seeing in the earlier pics and pardon me for misunderstanding your description. Without the distinct tip from the inner jacket, would guess that to be the later “Inner-Belted Hollow Point” design as Ray earlier suggested. Catalogs do show the “Inner-Belted” and “Belted” designs co-existed in 1940 and 1941 listings.

Dave


#15

That design was later simplified as the well known Core-Lokt (on the right in the photo).

Ray