Pistol and Mannlicher(?) cartridges ID

So i found those 4 cartridges on a WWI battlefield. I know KP is some finnish factory and SFM is Societe Francaise des Munitions or something but as the battlefield is in Romania I suppose that the possibility is excluded. Also, if it’s not noticeable, on the small, pistol cartridge, at 6 o’clock is “44”. Can someone give me an ID for them? Thanks anticipately20190501_181313-1



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#1 is a Soviet 7.62x25 TT.

The “KP” is not Finnish as this is Cyrrillic and means “KR” and is indicating the manufacturer of the brass the case was made of.
This is a Riussian 7.62x54R case.

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Thanks, but do you know how can I discover the producer of the cartridge or the rifle that used the Russian 7.62? Also, “05” means 1905 as the year of production?

Yes 05 indicates 1905.
7,62x54R was used in Mosin Nagant rifles, and from 1910 also Maxim machine guns. Later on a multitude of firearms for the cartridge were adopted.

Ole

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Thank you! How about the french and german ones?

The “П” (latin P) says it was made in St. Petersburg.

The DWM 7x64 (hunting) case is unspectacular and quite modern in my view. The “KT” is giving the year (coded), I am sure the experts soon will tell the date.

The SFM case you should show from the side and give measurements (like with any other case you are asking for ID).

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It’s a Mannlicher case, i can’t show any photos as I don’t have it with me in this moment.
I measured it some time ago and it had a 6.5 mm caliber and a length of 54 mm, so i suppose it is a Mannlicher. I want to know just what the monogram means.

If by the monogram, you mean the back-to-back, intertwined “GG” at the 6 o’clock position, it stands for Gevelot & Gaupillat, Paris, which became S.F.M.

John Moss

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Oh, ok, thanks a lot!

Andf #1 was made in the Ulyanovskfactory, code 3, in Russia, 1944.

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The SFM case would be for the 6.5 m/m Romanian Mannlicher rimmed. Jack

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The Soviet 7.62x25 Tokarev round was made at the Ulyanovsk Machinery Plant, in 1944.

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Thank you all!