Polte Magdeburg 7,65 auto


#1

I have the following Polte manufactured 7,65 auto cartridges:

P 7,65B M 39, cn projo, brass case & primer
P 7,65D M 39, gmcs projo, brass case & primer
aux 7,65 1 40, cn projo, brass case, cp primer
auc 7,65 1 41, cn projo, brass case, cp primer

Anyone have any ideas what the “D” and “B” indicate in the 1939 headstamps?

Thanks,
Dave


#2

Dave - can you please send me a good photo of the “D” headstamp you mention. I have never seen this or heard of it, despite a long time search and study of this caliber (oddly, I have no use at all for the .25, .32 and .380 cartridges - the have little or nothing to recomment them for any purpose - but I am love with them for collecting! Nobody ever said I was sane.

I have no comments oi right now.

Add to your list: P M (12 o’clock/6 o’clock) format, GMCS RN, Round copper primer.

Also thought by some to be either loaded by Polte or made for them; I am not convinced: P P M 37 - CN Bullet, Sinoxid “O” primer lackered red, red mouth seal. I believe this cartridge to be made by Geco.
P. 1934 - CN Bullet, Copper Sinoxid “O” primer, no seals.
I also believe this round was made by Geco.


#3

Dave, can you also post a pic of the “auc” headstamp?


#4

There is also the “P Ex 33” dummy.


#5

I forgot about the Exerzierpatronen. There are hole variations with the P Ex 33 dummy, and also a dummy of the same basic specs with two position (12 o’clock/6 o’clock format) P Ex with no date.


#6

[quote=“dak21”]I have the following Polte manufactured 7,65 auto cartridges:

P 7,65B M 39, cn projo, brass case & primer
P 7,65D M 39, gmcs projo, brass case & primer
aux 7,65 1 40, cn projo, brass case, cp primer
auc 7,65 1 41, cn projo, brass case, cp primer

Anyone have any ideas what the “D” and “B” indicate in the 1939 headstamps?

Thanks,
Dave[/quote]

Can you post pictures of the headstamps?
Bob Ruebel


#7

Gents,

Sorry, but the “auc” Jon caught is a type-o! That should be “aux”.

I will attempt to photograph the rounds this weekend when I get home.

My guess on the D and B was a simple lot code. The 25 round boxes made by Polte had a “Lfg.” number and a “Rate” letter code on them. They look much like the FN boxes of the period.

Mr. Moss,

I have always searched for a “P M” h/s 7,65, but no luck so far.

I agree with you thoughts on the P P M 37.

Have you ever thought that the P 1934 might be Austrian? That would have been my guess.

Thanks,
Dave


#8

This might be helpful. It’s of some of the headstamps being discussed here, and one or two others I added.

I thought the PPM, P., and G were very interesting all close together like that.
.


#9

Some very nice rounds Jon!

Thanks for posting.

Dave


#10

Thanks, and you’re welcome.
Are my PM and aux any different than yours?


#11

Dave - I have been of the opinion that the “B” behind 7.65, because of its positioning, simply meant “Browning.” If the “D” you report is correct, that will change things a lot.


#12

Here is the picture.

What do you think?

Thanks,
Dave


#13

Nice to see that there are production variations. Even blown up a few times, I can’t definitively say if that’s really a “D” or just a bad-buntered “B”.


#14

Dave and Jon - I photo-shopped the picture to the best of my abilities and while what’s there looks more like a “D” than a “B”, it is never-the-less NOT clear enough in the photo for me to positively identify it as one letter or the other. The headstamp format is such that I am still inclined to think the letter following “7.65” is part of the cartridge description, with “B” standing for Browning. In that instance, I don’t know what in heck a “D” would stand for. I can’t accept that it is any kind of a lot identification, personally.

I have seen probably 20 rounds of this basic headstamp, all clearly “B” and never heard of one with “D” on it. None is pictured in any of the books I have that would show this headstamp at all. That is NOT definitive, but it makes me lean towards a bad bunter strike, even though I am NOT willing to come right out and say it is or it isn’t. Interesting. If I lived next door, I would come over and look at it.

The bullet variation isn’t definitive, as both are known with the “B”.


#15

On my screen & enlarged the “D” example looks like a broken or filled in bunter to my eye.


#16

Well John, stop on by anytime. What is 3,500 miles between friends. It looks like I may stopping by SF sometime in November.

Looking at the round more closely, I would say it is probably a broken bunter. There is no trace of the center line of the “B”, but I can see a very slight dimple in the outer edge that indicates it probably was there at one time.

Thanks for all the great comments guys.

Dave


#17

Dave - even if you replace the round in question at some time, keep the one you have in your collection as well, as there is still the outside possibility that your first impression was right. It wats nothing - there are no upkeep expenses for keeping it! :-) While I agree with Jon’s assessment again I must say that there has been no conclusive answer here yet.


#18

Agreed. You always keep rounds like that, you just never know.


#19

I think it is a “D” also. The “3” is also different shape. Congrats-a good hst.

Lew


#20

Dave, can you post higher resolution images of these headstamps?