Polymer-coated CCI .22LR

I’ve seen various polymer-coated offerings from CCI in .22LR, some of them with a certain colour scheme such as last year’s Christmas red and green poly coats and also the red, white and blue patriot offering:

image

image

Seems to me this coating is more of a marketing ploy since it affords the manufacturer the option of colouring the bullet any way they like.

Is there any tangible advantage of having the poly coating instead of the copper wash, for rounds being fired at 1235 fps?

Also, does anyone have the inside scoop on what the driver was, for introducing these poly-coated rounds?

1 Like

Coated bullets have been around since at least the 1980’s in terms of this sort of ammo, mostly from Federal’s “Nyclad” line. Nyclad’s were marketed to law enforcement who preferred .38spl or 9mm unjacketed or semi-jacketed soft lead bullets, but whom none of which enjoyed cleaning soft lead out of their barrels. The coating helps to keep lead out of the bore, and it also helps encapsulate more of the lead from the air in indoor ranges somewhat. The latter was more a part of the goal with Federal’s more recent effort, the “Syntech” line of ammo with red coated bullets. It’s basically an alternative to plating or jacketing which allows for different colors, and some competition shooters actually prefer a lead unjacketed bullet, but again the bore-cleaning becomes an issue. People are also more conscious of the desire to encapsulate more lead to keep it out of the air these days as well, which Syntech promotes.

There has also been a boom in coated bullets from many smaller to mid size manufacturer’s using the “Hy-Tek” bullet coatings in many colors. Those seem to be on the rise in popularity over the past 10 years a good bit. But yes, the novelty of the color is a good part of the equation as well.

“Hy-Tek” is Correctly Hi-Tek
http://hi-performancebulletcoatings.com/

Back to the CCI LR’s
Whats with the dimple in the bottom???
CCI%20USA%20cartridges

I haven’t seen a dimple like that before. Are those normal store-bought live rds?

Matt, that’s a box full of dummies that was displayed at SHOT Show 2018.

Matt - Didn’t Smith and Wesson ammunition introduce the Nyclad, rather than Federal, or am I confused as usual? I know that Federal made it too, but have forgotten who introduced it?

I saw a “Cops” TV segment once, real-life stuff, where they had arrested someone and while searching him and his vehicle, found a gun, which they emptied on the hood of a car. The Officer then explained that these were “cop-killer” bullets with Teflon coating. In actuality, the cartridges were clearly “Nyclad” rounds. Can’t blame the police officer because unless gun enthusiasts themselves, most of their knowledge on that subject came from all the anti-gun propaganda that the public was subjected to by the press and other ignorant people.

John M.

The “cop-killer” teflon coated bullets likely referered to the KTW line, right?

Ole

Correct Ole, & those KTW actually got that name because a member of the US congress called them that during a (successful) hearing to outlaw their use.

I may be wrong but a STORY goes that a Law Enforcement Officer was killed with one. Apparently he / she was shot in the (non-armored) throat, and died.

The KTW was often made with a different bullet profile than the typical “manufacturer”, and the color is a light green. I believe there are a number of posts on this forum about KTW

Yes, S&W did introduce the Nyclad line, but I think it only became more mainstream, or better known after Federal picked it up, similar to the Hydrashok situation.

Federal made [still makes?] a Gold Medal Match round with a dimple in the bottom, to distinguish their highest quality match round from other match rounds.
I have half a case [that I cannot get to] of it left from my competitive days.

it is not a gimmick. More like a trend. the poly coating encapsulates lead residue more effecitvely than FMJ pistol bullets which have an exposed lead base. A normally reliable source in Law Enforcement training says the coated bullets make it much easier to clean suppressed weapons. If you have ever cleaned a suppressor with hydrogen peroxide and vinager you know what I mean. Heavy metal poisioning is a serious issue and not just on indoor ranges. this ammo is also quite accurate. I have shot thousands of rounds of coated 9mm ammunition and any solvent that is useful on shotguns (plastic wads) removes the residue. Much easier than with jacketed bullets, actually. When reloading a coated bullet you do have to be careful to bell the mouth of the cartridge case enough that you do not scrape off the coating when seating the bullet. Basically, just treat them like a lead rather than a jacketed bullet. Which is ironic I guess!

Perhaps it is intended for the California market which has banned lead bullets for hunting?

Lead bullets with coating is still banned so no Peoples Republic of Kalifornia on them there cartridges.

OK, thanks! So they can’t have any lead in them at all.

“Also, does anyone have the inside scoop on what the driver was, for introducing these poly-coated rounds?”

You mean something other than just trying to make more money from people who will pay for Christmas or July 4th bullets?

Just saw some pink CCI 22’s being advertised, perhaps a hint towards the driver?

Probably a Breast Cancer fundraiser.

The packaging.
image004

I got an email today too.

http://www.media.vistaoutdoor.com/presskit/NPS/CCI/Clean-22Pink.aspx

1 Like