Price guides?


#1

Are there any cartridge price guides? Online or print?

I made a mistake this past weekend that I would like to no repeat.


#2

The IAA JOURNAL contains “Cartridge Prices” on a regular basis. Each issue is limited to a particular cartridge type, such as “Metric Rifle”, etc. Check the index on the Home Page.

Ray


#3

I just joined, haven’t quite gotten my first issue yet.

I was hoping there was something online that is searchable. I guess some of the online sellers’ prices are probably my best bet.


#4

Be careful. Be very careful.

You can order the CDs of all past issues for a very reasonable price. It will be one of the best investments you’ve ever made. That’s on the Home Page also.

JMHO

Ray


#5

I agree 100% with Ray on getting the CDs of the back issues of IAAJournals. You have a chance to get most all printed - and probably eventually all of them as time goes by and more CDs are made up.

Pricing cartridges is not a science. You will find there are wildly varying prices on the same item, from dealer to dealer, in the older collectables. By “older” I mean generally any ammo that by caliber, case type, headstamp etc. is not available on the shooting market in box quantities.

I think for individual case types, the IAA list may be one of the best, as it goes by observed and recorded sales. Occasionally, you will see the letters “NRS” after an item. This means they would not publish a price on that item, at the time of publication, because there were “No Recent Sales” recorded. That’s a great sign that it truly does record observed actual prices, and is not just one man’s opinion of value.

The IAA lists, however, do not deal with especially rare specimens, rare headstamps, rare loadings, etc. in case types that are generally common calibers, like 9mm Para, .30-06, .223 etc. Thus, it might show the general price of 9 mm Para rounds to be 75 cents, when there are rounds of that caliber that sell for a couple of hundred dollars per cartridge, and even more.
With the Hundreds of thousands of cartridges that could be collected, I believe even a relative complete value list is patently impossible to make up.
By the time someone did so, over the span it would take to gather such data, the whole list would probably be obsolete the day it was publsihed.

For values, like for many things, experience is the best teacher. After you observe enough individual collectors’ cartridges offered for sale, you will develop a feel for values - not to the penny, but ballpark “value zones.”

But, everything said, it is like with any other collectible commodity - any cartridge is worth exactly what someone will pay for it, and not a cent more.
If a cartridge is priced at 10.00, and every potential buyer passes, it is over-priced. JMHO


#6

Pete deCoux has auction catalogs that include realized prices. You can buy a whole series from him for a reasonable price and it can give you an idea of some of the more exotic collectible ammunition that is not covered on the IAA lists. Unfortunately there is no master index, but the individual catalogs are sectionalized. Here is his contact information pdbullets.com/Pdbullets.com/home.html

If you look at online auctions and listing pages for collectible ammunition, you will find like John points out, asking prices are all over the place. As they are just asking prices.

Joe


#7

[quote=“xjda68”]Pete deCoux has auction catalogs that include realized prices. You can buy a whole series from him for a reasonable price and it can give you an idea of some of the more exotic collectible ammunition that is not covered on the IAA lists. Unfortunately there is no master index, but the individual catalogs are sectionalized. Here is his contact information pdbullets.com/Pdbullets.com/home.html

If you look at online auctions and listing pages for collectible ammunition, you will find like John points out, asking prices are all over the place. As they are just asking prices.

Joe[/quote]

Pete actually contacted me and sent me his link. Appreciate the info guys.

I guess I’m not looking for super rare stuff for the most part. Just don’t want get taken on something common like I did last weekend believing it was something that it wasn’t.


#8

The only “accurate” pricing guides are for the specific cartridges found in specific auctions. They really can’t provide much guidance for variations of that cartridge, common specimens of the same caliber, or even scarcer variations than the example in that auction. Knowledge, observation, and experience are the only true “price guides”. Oh, then you have to throw in how much you really want the round.


#9

Basically, cartridge (like most) collecting is pretty much a hobby for discretionary income, not an investment program or wealth accumulation strategy. Does ownership of the object provide greater satisfaction than sitting on a wad of money in your wallet?

Guides are just that. However, for collector ammo, or any collector item no longer in production it really depends more on supply and demand, with spikes or valleys depending on precisely how badly a purchaser wants a particular item at that very moment, and how eager the seller is to get rid of it.

If you are patient and thrifty, you will eventually be able to find just about anything at a relatively low price.

If you are determined to get an example right away, or even soon, you will probably pay a lot more.

Is the immediate, or delayed, gratification from owning an item worth the premium price, or the savings respectively?

If we are talking about paying double the going price, it is not a big deal for something in the $10 or under range. If you are paying double on an item in the hundreds of dollars range, then that might be worth more thoughtful deliberation.

And, how often does an item come up at all? If this is the only one you have seen at any price in a year or more, is it worth it to pay a premium to get it now, or is a “thrifty streak” compelling you to pay no more than the last guy did, perhaps several years ago.


#10

All this is good advice but it comes down to how BAD do you want that specific cartridge? How much it is worth is determined by, is it the first of a group, is it the last one of a group, these play a very big roll in your worth. The auctions are a good place to check ,but as advised, if it stays around for a while it is overpriced or misrepresented. Rare Old cartridges can be found on simple web sites and they will give you a reasonable rarity. Never make the mistake of thinking is is an investment for the future, it will almost never pay off. Vic


#11

Beware of the grossly over used descriptive term “rare”. If you look at enough cartridge auction lists or cartridges for sale lists you will soon learn that many of these listings describe almost everything as “RARE”. “Knowledge is power” and “buyer beware” are two old cliches that definitely apply here.