Question on shipping from a rookie


#1

First off thanks for the let in. If I were to oil down primers in primed cases would they be legal shipping fodder by USPS codes and standards? I read here often, good site.


#2

sitkaak,

Welcome!

As a general rule USPS is pretty against any mailing of cartridges, primers even if thought to be made inert.

Plus, oiling down primers is not always 100% effective.

Additionally, as you may or may not know, even to ship primers or powder via Fedex or UPS you must have a certified haz mat shipping account.

Failure to comply with that can result in prosecution by the DOT or IATA with up to $250,000 fine and a year in jail.

Now, if you have a certified haz-mat account you can ship them for around $23.


#3

Actually, I may have read your question wrong. If you are mailing the primers, seated in the cases then it is still not OK through USPS, but only through UPS/Fedex. and you don’t need a haz-mat account; just the ORM-D label.


#4

Aaron322

Are you sure about that? If the primer is inerted (usually by oiling), a primed case can be sent via USPS. I have done it, a lot, and I’m sure others have too. AFAIK there is no prohibition against mailing inert components within the US.

Most of us have also done the same thing mailing overseas, although that practice is in question (do a search).

Ray


#5

Well, based on the proposed changes that become enacted July 6th, it will actually be LEGAL to sent inert explosives devices, (primers, would be included here, am i right?) with the following regulations:

a. The package is presented by the mailer at a retail counter.
b. Registered Mail is used. Registered Mail service is only
available for items mailed as either First-Class Mail or Priority Mail.
c. The address side of the package is labeled with ``REPLICA
EXPLOSIVE’’ using at least 20 point type or letters at least \1/4’'
high.

In my opinion, their wording currently displays as if it is banned:

Here is a direct link to the complete proposal:
http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/E9-31218.htm

[quote]DATE: Published in the Federal Register June 1, 2010.

Restricting the Mailing of Replica or Inert Explosive Devices

AGENCY: Postal Service™.

ACTION: Final rule.

SUMMARY:
The Postal Service is revising Mailing Standards of the United States Postal Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM®) 601.11, to implement a new standard restricting the mailing of replica or inert explosive devices, such as simulated grenades that are not dangerous but bear a realistic appearance to explosive devices, to Registered Mail™ service only.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 6, 2010.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Evans King, 202-268-4982 or Mary J. Collins 202-268-5440.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
The Postal Service published a proposed rule in the Federal Register on January 5, 2010 (75 FR 282-283) which added restrictions to the mailing of replica and inert explosive devices in the mail. The Postal Service did not receive any comments in response to this proposal. Therefore, we will be revising the DMM as proposed. The Postal Service will specifically identify these items using the term “replica or inert explosive devices” rather than the proposed “replica or inert munitions.” The Postal Service is also implementing a revised process for mailing such items via Registered Mail service only rather than prohibiting them from the mail altogether. [/quote]


#6

Aaron322

I’m not sure what any of this has to do with mailing inert SAA?

Ray


#7

I know. I thought he was talking about just primers at first, which are haz-mat and not under the orm-d provision. then you asked if I was sure about that, which is why i posted the USPS provision about primers…

Now that I look back you may have been questioning my statement in my second post, “If you are mailing the primers, seated in the cases then it is still not OK through USPS, but only through UPS/Fedex.” rather than the first post.

I guess there may be different provisions about inert cartridges being mailed.

Sorry about the confusion.

=)


#8

Aaron322–The fact that the USPS revised the wording as follows:

[color=#4000FF]The Postal Service will specifically identify these items using the term “replica or inert explosive devices” rather than the proposed “replica or inert munitions.”[/color]

says to me that INERT SAA is LEGAL. The use of the word “Devices” rather than “Munitions” means, to me, Fake Bombs, Grenades, etc.


#9

[quote=“RonMerchant”]Aaron322–The fact that the USPS revised the wording as follows:

[color=#4000FF]The Postal Service will specifically identify these items using the term “replica or inert explosive devices” rather than the proposed “replica or inert munitions.”[/color]

says to me that INERT SAA is LEGAL. The use of the word “Devices” rather than “Munitions” means, to me, Fake Bombs, Grenades, etc.[/quote]

Right. that was one provision change, from the original proposal in 2008. they were going to require registered mail for even inert munitions; now only for explosive devices.

I was all stuck-up on the primers aspect.

Though, this does seem like a win for all the InOrd guys…


#10

The root of the confusion and conflicting advice is the failure of the U.S. Postal Service to define “ammunition”.

By leaving it vague it can mean whatever they want it to, and you may or may not be committing a federal felony by mailing cartridge cases, bullets, cartridges with powder removed and primers rendered inert.

If pressed for a precise and comprehensive definition the USPS answer is likely to be to ban everything even remotely connected to ammunition. At least at present, one’s lawyer could argue that [whatever] is not actually “ammunition.”

So, I guess the response is “Do you feel lucky today?”