Red Hammer 7.62x39


#1

Does anyone know who was the owner and/or US importer of the “Red Hammer” brand used for 7.62 x 39 cartridges made by Barnaul?


#2

Fede,
I checked some Forums and the only references I found were some from back in 2004-2006 discussing it as “Red Hammer” brand by Barnaul. The 2006 post is a guy looking for it and can’t find it on the market.

I’ve never seen or heard of a box of “Red Hammer”.

Cheers,
Lew


#3

Lew, thanks for the help. Here are some pictures:

Red
Red1

Regards,

Fede


#4

Fede, is it confirmed to be a trademark in the west (US?) or was it probably a product line of BPZ?


#5

Alex, no, there isn’t a US or Canadian trademark or application, but it doesn’t look like a regular Barnaul product line either.


#6

Was this ammunition actually imported into the US? Also what year was it imported? A hammer and sickle logo is interesting as is the Windows 95esque logo on the back


#7

The Win 95esque logo is the BPZ logo as it was used before the late 2000s.


#8

Yes, it was imported into the US, but not sure when. Until the early 2000’s, the only approved distributors of Barnaul ammo were Dan’s Sporting Goods and PW Arms, the later being the sole importer and owner of the Barnaul brand in the US (before SSI). This company was raided by the ATF in June 2003, so this may have something to do with the fate of this ammunition.


#9

Never saw that advertised or in-the-flesh in the US.


#10

The posts I read on the Forums are very consistent with the Red Hammer ammo disappearing from the market no later than 2004 and likely a bit earlier.

https://www.thehighroad.org/index.php?threads/where-to-get-barnaul-7-62-ammo.114529/

Dec 04:
"My father and I noticed a few years ago that our favorite 7.62X39 ammo called Red Hammer was suddenly unavailable without any warning. We later realized that Red Hammer was Barnaul ammmunition and that had just stopped using the Red Hammer name. "

"When we had a chronograph (before my dad accidently killed it with his CZ-52) we had tested various types of 7.62X39 and the Brown Bear shot at the same velocities as the Barnaul (guy with a rifle on box) and the Red Hammer. Those 3 types ALL shot consistantly at around 2550 fps compared to the Wolf that was more like 2450 fps. After pulling and examining all of the bullets from Brown Bear, Barnaul, and Red Hammer 123g FMJ and HP they were identical in construction "


#11

I found another variant of this box with HP bullets. It was available from SOG as early as 2002.

2002


#12

PW Arms apparently did several imports which were brief, one-time-only deals, and the import of this ammo may have been cut short by whatever the ATF raid was all about. I know that PW in Redmond, Washington was one of only two importers to import the Techno Arms MAG-7 shotgun (as the civilian MAG-7M1) during the 1990’s, and they only brought in around 100. Those goofy-looking civilian legal guns were notoriously often cut down to remove the stock and shorten the barrel so the gun would return to its intended configuration, and the ATF was sniffing around on that issue.


#13

not redhammer, but got this today from Century


#14

How do they import ammo from Russia these days?


#15

I’ve seen Barnaul 7,62x54R cases stamped as MFS as well. So they are from the EU. :-)


#16

America has NOT imposed a ban on them…they only enforce, that Europe does this :-))
Peter


#17

Aha, interesting! Being almost at war with Russia and business is as usual?
And telling others to boykot Russia?

Vince, the BPZ-MFS were somewhat earlier than 2014 if I remember correctly no?


#18

This is the latest production made by Vympel with standard “В” headstamp.


#19

Forensic and EOD ask an interesting question, so I decided to do some research.

In July 2017 Congress passed a bill, by a very wide margin to authorize the President to impose strong sanctions against Russia and to prohibit the President from removing any of the current sanctions. Trump approved the bill, perhaps because the vote in Congress was so overwhelming that they would have approved overriding his veto. President Trump however declined to impose any of the authorized sanctions until the last few weeks.

In December the State Department issued Guidance (see direction at URL below) for the identification of people who should sanctioned and listing Defense and Intelligence sector organizations to be effected.
https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/12/04/2017-26087/guidance-on-specified-persons-under-section-231-of-the-countering-russian-influence-in-europe-and

Rostec/Tula is one of the organizations listed. Barnaul is not listed but they may be owned by one of the listed organizations.

One of the shooter websites published the following which includes info on the Bill passed buy Congress and other actions undertaken. See
http://www.akoperatorsunionlocal4774.com/2018/01/russian-tula-ammo-ban-judgement-day/

The core of this is:
> On October 27, 2017, the US Department of State issued public guidance on the implementation of Section 231 of the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act of 2017 (CAATSA). CAATSA requires the imposition of certain sanctions on persons who have knowingly engaged in a significant transaction, on or after August 2, 2017, with a person that is part of or operating for or on behalf of the defense or intelligence sectors of the Government of the Russian Federation.
> And Section 231 of CAATSA requires the President to impose, on January 29, 2018 and thereafter, five or more of the following sanctions measures on persons who have knowingly engaged in a significant transaction with any of the above listed entities on or after the date of enactment of CAATSA (August 2, 2017):
_> _
> Denial of Export-Import Bank financing. The President may direct the Export-Import Bank of the United States not to give approval to the issuance of any guarantee, insurance, extension of credit, or participation in the extension of credit in connection with the export of any goods or services to the sanctioned person.
> Export Sanctions. The President may order the United States Government not to issue any specific license and not to grant any other specific permission or authority to export any goods or technology to the sanctioned person under the Export Administration Act of 1979, the Arms Export Control Act, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, or any other statute that requires the prior review and approval of the United States Government as a condition for the export or reexport of goods or services.
> Loans from US financial institutions. The President may prohibit any United States financial institution from making loans or providing credits to the sanctioned person totaling more than $10,000,000 in any 12-month period unless the person is engaged in activities to relieve human suffering and the loans or credits are provided for such activities.
> Loans from international financial institutions. The President may direct the United States executive director to each international financial institution to use the voice and vote of the United States to oppose any loan from the international financial institution that would benefit the sanctioned person.
> Prohibitions on financial institutions. The following prohibitions may be imposed against the sanctioned person if that person is a financial institution:
> Prohibition on designation as a primary dealer. Neither the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System nor the Federal Reserve Bank of New York may designate, or permit the continuation of any prior designation of, the financial institution as a primary dealer in United States Government debt instruments.
> Prohibition on service as repository for government funds. The financial institution may not serve as agent of the United States Government or serve as repository for United States Government funds.
> Procurement sanction. The United States Government may not procure, or enter into any contract for the procurement of, any goods or services from the sanctioned person.
> Foreign exchange. The President may, pursuant to such regulations as the President may prescribe, prohibit any transactions in foreign exchange that are subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and in which the sanctioned person has any interest.
> Banking transactions. The President may, pursuant to such regulations as the President may prescribe, prohibit any transfers of credit or payments between financial institutions or by, through, or to any financial institution, to the extent that such transfers or payments are subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and involve any interest of the sanctioned person.
> Property transactions. The President may, pursuant to such regulations as the President may prescribe, prohibit any person from (1) acquiring, holding, withholding, using, transferring, withdrawing, transporting, importing, or exporting any property that is subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and with respect to which the sanctioned person has any interest; and (2) dealing in or exercising any right, power, or privilege with respect to such property; or conducting any transaction involving such property.
> Ban on investment in equity or debt of such person. The President may, pursuant to such regulations or guidelines as the President may prescribe, prohibit any United States person from investing in or purchasing significant amounts of equity or debt instruments of the sanctioned person.
> Exclusion of corporate officers. The President may direct the Secretary of State to deny a visa to, and the Secretary of Homeland Security to exclude from the United States, any alien that the President determines is a corporate officer or principal of, or a shareholder with a controlling interest in, the sanctioned person.
> Sanctions on principal executive officers. The President may impose on the principal executive officer or officers of the sanctioned person, or on persons performing similar functions and with similar authorities as such officer or officers, any of the sanctions under this subsection.

Note, the President must impose at least five of these 14 sanctions, and I can find no information on which he has imposed. As of early January there is no evidence that any Russian ammo had been banned from import into the US.

I would be very interested to hear what Germany and other Western countries have done to ban the import of Russian ammunition and when it was done.

My thanks to EOD and Forensic for opening up this subject.

Cheers,
Lew

PS: Remember posts must be ammo related and non-political so please stay away from political opinion or judgments and stick to the facts on banning the import of Russian ammunition.


#20

Lew, to what I know is that Russian ammo does not get into the EU now but as usual some eastern countries have a way to do so (how ever that works - guess noone will tell us).
I am sure Peter will know much more than I do.