Reference material on primer types and history

Does anyone know of a really good general reference (book, whitepaper, etc) on the history and development of different types of primers? I don’t want to be overwhelmed with details but it is something I am not very familiar with and would like a general discussion that starts with paper cartridges and goes all the way to modern cartridges. Not sure if something like this exists…
Thanks for any input!
Joel

Maybe this, as a starting point?

Cartridges: A Pictorial Digest of Small Arms Ammunition, by Herschel C. Logan.
Logan was a commercial artist and writer with a strong firearms interest. This book contains excellent drawings, labels, and identification for cartridge types illustrating development from paper cartridge to the modern types. Patient delving into this volume will show an alert reader how paper cartridges became metal cartridges. Most general readers have no conception, for example, how many competing systems were in place during the Civil War. By 1873 all had become obsolete but the two still in use toda–rimfire and center fire. Logan divides cartridge types into groups: paper, combustible, separate primed, self-contained, rimfire, and center fire. Each of these divisions break down into variations. All systematic discussions must use or grapple with these divisions. The most common Civil War cartridge was a paper wrapper which held black powder and a bullet. The cartridge had to be torn or bitten open, the powder poured down the barrel, followed by the bullet and rammed until compact. A percussion cap was added to the weapon to ignite the powder. A quantum leap forward was a metal cartridge with a hole in the base. It was loaded into the weapon and the percussion cap was added outside. Finally a complete cartridge was developed which could be placed inside the weapon and fired when the chamber was closed. The author shows what the competing systems were and how they worked. His book is a good introduction. Any serious collector or student of cartridge history will need more references, but Logan’s Cartridges can be the beginning place for the study. There are a few errors and, obviously, omissions but the work is excellent for its vintage. Few fifty year old books on technology can claim that.–By Antonius Tio.–For Amazon.com.

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Awesome, thanks Jon. It’s on the way from Amazon now!
Joel